DPR was an early adopter of integrated project delivery, lean management and other collaborative methods, including one of the industry’s first ever 11-party IPD contracts. We strive to continuously push the industry forward with the help of our IPD and lean specialists.



March 27, 2017

Three Things to Know about “Integrating Project Delivery”

What if every building and every piece of infrastructure truly worked? What if they were all designed not simply to fill a need but to enhance our way of life? What if every building performed as highly as possible, with all systems working in concert to support its purpose? (Integrating Project Delivery, Chapter 1.2)

If you are someone who believes there is a better way to design and build buildings, infrastructure, dwellings, etc., then you should spend some time reading Integrating Project Delivery written by Martin Fischer, Howard Ashcraft, Dean Reed and Atul Khanzode. Written as a textbook, it is the first comprehensive look at the Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) system. If you tackle it in bits and pieces, you’ll discover a road map for integrating project delivery filled with stories, practical knowledge and applications, legal structures for supporting the process, and real-life examples—all written with a dose of inspiration that there are actually many different ways teams can achieve better outcomes.

 Following are three things to know about Integrating Project Delivery:

  • Integrating Project Delivery is organized around a Simple Framework, a road map for producing a high-performing building, a “building that supports its end users in performing their activities as optimally as possible."

  • Each chapter asks and answers one or two big questions, including “what does success look like?” 
Chapter Title Question
1

What Would Make Us Proud 

What do we want to do and what can we do? 
2 Transitioning to IPD: Owners’ Experiences  What do owners who have used integrated project delivery (IPD) think about what they can do to improve outcomes? 
3 Putting it All Together: A Simple Framework  What is the roadmap, the strategy to successfully produce a high-performance building? 
4 Defining High-Performing Buildings  What is a high-performing building? 
5 Achieving High-Value Buildings  What makes a high-value building? 
6 Integrating the Building’s Systems  How can systems be integrated to achieve a high-performing building? 
7 Integrating Process Knowledge  How can process knowledge be integrated? 
8 Integrating the Project Organization  What is an integrated project organization and how is it created? 
9 Managing Integrated Project Teams What is an integrated project delivery team, and how do you create and manage one? 
10 Integrating Project Information  What does it mean to integrate project information, why is this so important, and how can we do this? 
11 Managing with Metrics How do define and uphold the client’s value goals for their unique high performing building? 
12 Visualizing and Simulating Building Performance  How do we enable stakeholders to visualize and understand how their building will perform through every step of design, long before it is built? 
13 Collaborating in an Integrated Project  What does it mean to collaborate in an integrated project? 
14 Co-locating to Improve Performance  How can we leverage co-location to improve behaviors and outcomes? 
15 Managing Production as an Integrated Team  How do we manage the production as an integrated project team? 
16

Avoiding the Pitfalls of Traditional Contracts 

Why is it so difficult to use traditional contracts to support project integration? 
17

Contracting for Project Integration 

How does an integrated form of agreement support integrated organization and behaviors? 
18 Delivering the High Performance Building as a Product  How high-performing, valuable buildings can be developed and delivered as a product? 
  • Chapter 2 is dedicated to the owners’ experience in their own words and observations as they transitioned to IPD. Fourteen industry leaders, who were all involved in IPD projects, participated in a series of interviews that confirmed that IPD is an owner-driven process and frustration with existing project delivery systems was the most common reason for turning to IPD.

    When asked what it took to be a good IPD owner, the group identified five key characteristics: 

    • Clarity – Define what you want and what the IPD team must achieve
    • Commitment – An ongoing willingness to support the process with training and resources
    • Engagement – An active and knowledgeable participant who maintains a daily presence on the project
    • Leadership – Knowing when to lead and when not to lead, how to set the expectations for the project but also share leadership responsibilities
    • ​Integrity – Setting the project tone and creating an environment of trust 

Published by Wiley and now available on Amazon, Integrating Project Delivery details the “why” and “how” of IPD and how to organize and execute projects to achieve better value for all participants as an integrated team. It is a guide for aligning project collaborators and a promise for designing and building a better, higher performing built environment for us all.

January 22, 2016

Trust is Key for First IPD Data Center for Digital Realty

DPR’s longstanding relationship with Digital Realty (DLR), forged over the course of more than a decade and more than 150 successful data center projects across the U.S., laid the groundwork for DLR’s first time using integrated project delivery (IPD) on a data center project in Richardson, TX.

By entering into a seven-party integrated form of agreement (IFOA), the IPD team shared all project risks and rewards on the $37.3 million, 140,000-sq.-ft. project. 

Like any challenging data center project, DLR's data center saw its fair share of challenges, such as schedule pressure due to intense rainfall, and the fact that this was the first IPD project that many of the firms involved had ever undertaken. However, the project was completed on the original 10-month schedule in July, approximately $500,000 under the original targeted value. The DLR data center came to be a true testament of what can be accomplished by a solution-oriented team backed by a high degree of trust, collaboration, and a shared commitment to finish on time and under budget. 

To learn more, read the full article here

September 24, 2015

Eight Strategies for Project Success Using Lean, BIM and IPD

With the increased complexity and variability in the building process, building owners are seeking more predictable results from project delivery methods. Project teams are using lean methodology, integrated project delivery (IPD), and building information modeling (BIM) to contribute to the success of many projects. With a carefully, intentionally designed system, teams can eliminate unknown variables, while meeting cost, schedule, and design quality goals.

Atul Khanzode, leader of DPR’s Construction Technologies Group, recently wrote a white paper titled, “Setting your Project Up for Success Using Lean, BIM, and IPD.” 

In this white paper, Atul outlines eight strategies for facilitating productivity and success in a project. A DPR team recently applied these strategies on a project and was able to cut down construction time by a month and increase their productivity by 22%. 

But wait, what are these eight important strategies? Read this White Paper Watch for a summary or the full white paper to learn more.

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Photo courtesy of David Cox

July 30, 2015

18 Years of BIM

The industry has evolved in the last 25 years since DPR was founded. Building information modeling (BIM), however, has been a part of DPR since the early days of the company. As a long-established leader in virtual design and construction (VDC) and BIM, we know that it's not just the technology alone, but the smart use of technology that can help the right project team deliver predictable results and improve project efficiency.

We used an early version of BIM in 1997 on a project in the Bay Area for basic site logistics, visualization and construction sequencing to identify time/space conflicts.

Ten years later, DPR achieved a major breakthrough on Sutter Health’s Camino Medical Group Mountain View campus, which completed in 2007. Camino was the first DPR project to use a combination of BIM, integrated project delivery (IPD) and lean methodology.

On the Camino project, the team's strategic use of BIM on the 250,000-sq.-ft. outpatient medical center resulted in an estimated cost and time savings of at least $9 million and six months over the traditional CM-at-risk approach. Since then, the benefits and services of BIM have continued to evolve.

Now, almost ten years after the start of the Camino project and 18 years since we first started using it, we use BIM on 85% of our projects before work even begins in the field.

*This blog post is part of a series that celebrates DPR's silver anniversary and focuses on 25 great things from the company from over 25 years. Here's the last one

Follow #DPR25 on social media to learn more.

June 14, 2015

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay: Integrated Project, Integrated Delivery

The UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay in San Francisco is the nation’s first integrated project of its size and scope, according an article published by Healthcare Design, a resource that reaches, informs and influences key decision makers responsible for healthcare facilities.

The 289-bed, six-story, 878,000-sq.-ft. campus is home to three specialty hospitals:

  • The 183-bed Benioff Children’s Hospital with urgent/emergency care, primary care and specialty outpatient services.
  • The Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital offering cancer care, specialty surgery and 36-bed birth center.
  • The 70-bed Bakar Cancer Hospital for adults.

The team, which included DPR and Stantec, also built the project using an integrated approach—working together nearly 18 months prior to the start of construction to virtually design and construct the facility in the Integrated Center for Design and Construction (ICDC) onsite. Techniques including target value design, building information modeling (BIM), model-based estimating, and lean methodology allowed the team to reduce costs without reducing scope.

“There’s a lot of interest beyond our shores about how we were able to do this and how it can be adopted into other places,” UCSF Director of Design and Construction Stuart Eckblad told Healthcare Design. “I think we’ve made a significant contribution in how people are thinking about their buildings…and instead of thinking about the cost, thinking about the value.”

Completed late last year and opened on Feb. 1, the project has achieved LEED Gold certification and won a Fiatech CETI award for scenario-based project planning, as well as been spoken about at numerous national conferences, including ASHE PDC in San Antonio in March.

January 6, 2015

How Team’s Technical Expertise Helped Gulfstream Project Soar

With BIM and lean techniques being especially helpful for equipment and schedule coordination, DPR Hardin built a 430,000-sq.-ft. manufacturing space for Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation. 

Gulfstream develops and manufactures the world’s most technologically advanced business-jet aircraft. However, it wasn't DPR Hardin’s deep aerospace experience that ultimately won the job; it was solid technical expertise, which offers clear parallels to aerospace manufacturing.

How did collaboration with the owner, a unique foundation and a complex web of infrastructure systems factor into the equation? 

Read the full story here to learn more (including why it was described as "one of coolest, most challenging and satisfying jobs most of the team has ever built").

DPR Review Gulfstream
Photo courtesy of David Robinson Photography

October 6, 2014

Whitepaper Watch: Getting the Most Out of BIM

Mc Bim Datacenter

When VDC apps are used correctly, project teams have the opportunity to improve productivity, reduce rework in the field, enhance building documentation, and feed into management systems that can result in lower long-term facility operating costs.

In light of these potential benefits, it can be tempting to think of software as a “silver bullet” to the solution to the many complex hurdles that project teams face. But even the very best software is simply a tool and is only useful if the person (or team) who wields it, does so effectively.

In a new DPR white paper, “Getting the Most Out of BIM: The Secret Guide to VDC Apps,” DPR’s Andrew Fisher addresses those issues and more. The educational guide for owners and users describes what major apps can do and which ones currently lead the market in six functional areas: BIM authoring, coordination, visualization, analysis and measurement, sequencing and estimating.

For coordination, Autodesk Navisworks Manage stands out for its clash detection capabilities, while Autodesk BIM 360 Glue is also gaining popularity. Tapping into the power of the “cloud” to access the model, BIM 360 Glue works with iPads in the field.

For other BIM functions, some of the top applications include Lumion 3D for visualization, Solibri Model Checker for analysis and measurement, Synchro for sequencing, and Vico for estimating, to name just a few.

Understanding how to select and fully utilize the best BIM tools to their potential can create the most direct benefits to a project team’s processes, productivity and overall performance on a job.

The whitepaper was highlighted in the latest edition of the DPR Review, and can be viewed in full here.

September 1, 2014

Is Guaranteed Building Performance Possible?

Guaranteed building performance has the potential to create more efficient buildings for the benefit of the owner’s bottom line, building occupants and the environment.

That’s the assessment of Steve Selkowitz, who explains the idea in a recent article for the DPR Review. Selkowitz has led Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Building Technology and Urban Systems Department for 20-plus years and has been recognized for his commitment to advancing building performance including winning the 2014 Award of Excellence from Engineering News-Record.

Tighter codes and regulations, rising costs, an increased demand for more employee-friendly workplaces, and commitment to sustainability are bringing discussions around guaranteed performance to the forefront. But the gap between predicted and measured building systems’ performance presents a major challenge.

 “Most people initially like the concept of guaranteed building performance,” Selkowitz said, “but they say, ‘Wait, how can I guarantee what an owner or occupant will do downstream?’ The key is to first define the energy use target, and then execute a design, construct and operate plan that keeps those targets in mind as a myriad of later decisions are made.”

Read the full article, “Is Guaranteed Building Performance Possible?”, in the latest issue of the DPR Review.

March 4, 2014

Partner Profile: Talking Collaboration with SmithGroupJJR

Recently, we caught up with SmithGroupJJR’s Senior Vice President, William L. Diefenbach, FAIA, to talk about the different facets of collaboration in today's building landscape. No strangers to the concept of collaboration, DPR and SmithGroupJJR have worked on close to 50 projects together.

In this interview with Diefenbach, he discusses alternative project delivery methods, building information modeling (BIM), co-location, where innovative solutions come from, and more.

The Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine Building at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)—an award-winning DPR/SmithGroupJJR design/build project—is also discussed in the article. Built on a narrow, steep and sloped site, the $85 million, 67,000-sq.-ft,. LEED® Gold research facility required teamwork and creativity in the building process.

UCSF Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine Building
UCSF Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine Building Photo courtesy of Bruce Damonte

February 20, 2014

Self-Perform Work and More at UHS Temecula Valley Hospital

As detailed in this short article, DPR's self-perform work was an important part of building the 35-acre, ground-up Universal Health Services (UHS) Temecula Valley Hospital.

This extensive project case study provides even more insight into the 177,508-sq.-ft., five-story, greenfield hospital tower project.

Using integrated project delivery (IPD), the team delivered the 140-bed hospital, which features all-private rooms, a 20-bed intensive care unit and six high-tech surgical suites. Completed ahead of schedule, the project also finished at an estimated 40 percent lower “per bed” cost than the average new Southern California hospital facility.

Temecula Blog Photo Template
Photo courtesy of Lawrence Anderson Photography, Inc.

“The project was very dynamic,” said Michael Fontana of Fontana Associates, the company acting as the owner’s representative. “We kept changing the way we looked at things, the way we processed information and the way the work flowed. There were all kinds of solutions we discovered to make productivity go up.”