We strive to be integral and indispensable to our communities. This company-wide vision is implemented on the local level through volunteer action spearheaded by individual jobsites, regional offices and grants from the DPR Foundation.



June 12, 2017

Teens Become Leaders at DPR Richmond’s Second Annual School of Construction

Richmond, Virginia teenagers had the opportunity to learn about construction planning and safety and then test their leadership skills guiding younger children through a hands-on build project during DPR’s three-day School of Construction for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Richmond this May.

DPR’s Mid-Atlantic office tailored their second annual School of Construction event in a way designed to better engage teen members of the local Boys & Girls Clubs. Around 25 members from the Northside and Southside clubs, including five older teens, participated. They joined together with 16 DPR employees to plan and run an event that shared DPR’s unique technical skillsets with the community while educating local youth.

“The goal was really expanding our partnership with the Boys & Girls Clubs and better engaging their teen population,” said Diane Rossini, community outreach coordinator for DPR’s Richmond office. “All of the teens were very excited to take ownership of the build. It was great to see the smiles on their faces when they succeeded in working through a problem.”

School Of Construction Sketch Up
Teens were introduced to construction planning and BIM tools used in real-world scenarios including P6 scheduling, 3-D and 4-D modeling. Photo courtesy of Diane Rossini

The School of Construction event kicked off with a planning day with the teen leaders. Teens partnered with DPR volunteers and discussed how they would be leading the hands-on building groups. DPR employees had the chance to share their various career paths and what DPR stands for as a company. The teens were also introduced to construction planning and Building Information Modeling (BIM) tools used in real-world scenarios including P6 scheduling, 3-D and 4-D modeling.

A follow-up pre-build and safety day with the teen leaders offered the teens an opportunity to work side-by-side with DPR volunteers, complete with a PPE safety gear demo and pre-task plan. The teens worked through the building process and gained the confidence they needed to lead the younger club members on build day.

During the actual School of Construction Day at DPR’s Richmond office, the youth were exposed to virtual and augmented reality tools used in construction and offered a chance to interact with a virtual construction site. Teen leaders guided groups of younger students to build five prefabricated planter boxes. Those boxes will be donated to Renew Richmond’s community garden education program at G.H. Reid Elementary School and installed by DPR volunteers in June.

School Of Construction Smile
Teen leaders guided groups of younger students to build prefabricated planter boxes, which were donated to Renew Richmond’s community garden education program. Photo courtesy of Diane Rossini

Darricka Carter, director of corporate & foundation relations for Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Richmond, commented, “DPR’s School of Construction provided our club members a chance to learn new skills, be exposed to new career opportunities and instilled in them a sense of accomplishment. The skillsets they gained will help them set goals for their future and develop personally and professionally.”

Feedback from the teens themselves showed DPR succeeded in that goal–one that challenged them well beyond the typical role as student to take on a leadership role as a teacher instead.

“It was challenging to teach kids to want more,” said Tyreicq, one of the teen leaders. “I told them that if you want something you’ve never had in your life, you will have to do something you’ve never done.”

School Of Construction Group Photo
The DPR School of Construction gave Boys & Girls Club members a chance to learn new skills, be exposed to new career opportunities and instilled in them a sense of accomplishment. Photo courtesy of Diane Rossini

Teen leader Amira, a graduating senior who plans to major in mechanical engineering in college, had the chance to partner directly with DPR team members from engineering backgrounds who shared their experience with her. “It was cool to hear the perspectives of other individuals with similar interests and educational backgrounds,” she said.

David LeFebvre, director of development at Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Richmond added, “The School of Construction was a beautiful blend of service-learning, DPR employees’ expertise and team-building. It was such a well-designed program that allowed our kids to learn about what different kinds of jobs are out there, how they can contribute to their community, and how important it is to work as a team. This kind of activity is exactly what BGCMR is looking for to get our kids ready for life.” 

School Of Construction Planter Boxes
The planter boxes at G.H. Reid Elementary School were installed by DPR volunteers in June and will serve Renew Richmond’s community garden education program for years to come. Photo courtesy of Diane Rossini

May 19, 2017

DPR Austin Volunteers Show Big Heart in Tiny House Build

Despite the diminutive size of a tiny house project that DPR recently completed for Community First! Village in Austin, more than 50 DPR volunteers brought big building skills and even bigger heart to the job.

The project is part of a 27-acre development owned by Mobile Loaves & Fishes that will ultimately offer around 275 disabled, chronically homeless people in central Texas a long-term living community.

“It’s been nothing short of phenomenal,” commented Alan Graham, director of Mobile Loaves and Fishes at Community First! Village. “The DPR team is just awesome. From a corporate culture point of view, that whole (DPR) team out there has been stellar and it blows me away that a company as large as DPR has such a big heart.” 

Tiny House2 Edited
Over 50 volunteers from DPR Austin put their unique, technical skills to work to build a tiny home for a chronically homeless person in Austin. Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

The large volunteer workforce, including skilled craftspeople, self-perform drywallers, painters, carpenters and others, constructed the tiny house over about two and a half weeks in April. In true DPR style, crews willingly jumped in to help construct the 220-sq.-ft. tiny house with a 300-sq.-ft. rooftop deck, even though all are busy on DPR projects in the thriving Austin market. The volunteer workforce included the many other DPR employees on jobsites who covered their colleagues’ work while they were away building the tiny house.

Graham described the Community First! Village model as a “radical new movement” designed to provide a new start for the formerly homeless.

“It’s really centered around the idea that housing will never solve homelessness, but community will,” he said. 

Tiny House3 Edited
Volunteers constructed the house over about two and a half weeks in April. Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

Record-Setting Build
While the end product itself may be tiny, the challenges getting the tiny house completed on DPR’s self-imposed two-and-a-half-week schedule loomed large. That build schedule easily surpassed the speed that any of the other 130 or so tiny houses on site have gone up to date. 

“DPR built this faster than Community First! has ever seen one of their tiny houses come together – ever,” said DPR’s Angie Weyant, one of the project’s organizers. The team also overcame challenges including inclement weather and design adjustments. 

Tiny House1 Edited
The Community First! Village will provide a new start for the formerly homeless. Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

Taking Stock of Lessons Learned
Although it has been challenging, in typical DPR fashion, volunteers “are already talking about when we do this the next time, how will we do it better?” Weyant said with a laugh. “What makes us different is the initiative and genuine desire of our teams to use our technical and self-perform work skills to make a positive impact in the communities in which we operate.”

For now, they are making plans for a ribbon-cutting or housewarming ceremony, perhaps with the lucky tenant who moves into the DPR-built tiny house. While the reward for the new tenant is a permanent home to live in while they pay rent and contribute to the community around them, for the DPR team, the payoff is simply knowing they made a difference to someone in need.

March 16, 2017

DPR Foundation Awards Nearly $800,000 in Grants

Earlier this year, 22 organizations around the country received nearly $800,000 in grants from the DPR Foundation. DPR employees volunteer thousands of hours annually with these organizations, helping with facility renovations, youth career guidance and board service. Hands-on volunteer service multiplies the impact of the financial gifts, and helps DPR’s partner organizations advance their missions.

The DPR Foundation is a central component of DPR’s philanthropic vision of supporting under-resourced communities through facility construction and renovation; career and education guidance for youth; and support of operational capabilities for nonprofits. Organizations supported by the DPR Foundation focus on working with under-resourced youth to help them maximize their potential.

Atlanta Foundation Check
ATLANTA: Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta, Brookhaven Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

Now in its ninth year of giving, the DPR Foundation has awarded $5.8 million to organizations across the country, with an average grant size of $35,000. The Foundation has developed lasting relationships with the organizations it serves, including the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta, Brookhaven. Since 2008, more than 75 DPR employees have volunteered at the Brookhaven Club, totaling over 4,000 hours. DPR volunteers have impacted over 3,800 young people who use the club’s after-school programs.

“It takes longtime partners like this to drive real change and, through our shared vision, we are working every day to help thousands of children reach their full potential,” said Missy Dugan, president and CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta. “DPR really cares about the future of our city and they show it at our clubs. Not only have they contributed significant funding over the years, but their leaders and employees have spent countless hours working with our kids and making our spaces more welcoming and inspiring.”

Richmond Foundation Check
RICHMOND: Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Richmond Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

The DPR Foundation’s 2017 grants were awarded to the following organizations:

  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta, Brookhaven (Atlanta, GA)
  • LifeWorks (Austin, TX)
  • Girls Inc. of Orange County (Costa Mesa, CA)
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas, Oak Cliff (Dallas, TX)
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Durham and Orange Counties (Durham, NC)
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Houston, Holthouse (Houston, TX)
  • Girls Inc. of Alameda County (Oakland, CA)
  • Playworks Northern California (Oakland, CA)
  • Children's Home Society, Perinatal Program (Orlando, FL)
  • Peninsula Bridge (Palo Alto, CA)
  • Future For KIDS (Phoenix, AZ)
  • New Pathways for Youth (Phoenix, AZ)
  • Playworks Arizona (Phoenix, AZ)
  • UMOM Leaders in Training (Phoenix, AZ)
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Richmond (Richmond, VA)
  • Boys & Girls Club of Placer County (Sacramento, CA)
  • WEAVE Charter School (Sacramento, CA)
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of San Dieguito, La Colonia (San Diego, CA)
  • Food 4 Kids Backpack Program (San Diego, CA)
  • Seven Tepees (San Francisco, CA)
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Tampa, Wilbert Davis (Tampa, FL)
  • Milagro Center (West Palm Beach, FL)
Houston Foundation Check
HOUSTON: Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Houston, Holthouse Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton
Bay Area Foundation Check
BAY AREA: Girls Inc. of Alameda County Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton
Orlando Foundation Check
ORLANDO: Perinatal Program, Children's Home Society Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton
Tampa Foundation Check
TAMPA: Boys & Girls Clubs of Tampa, Wilbert Davis Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton
West Palm Beach Foundation Check
WEST PALM BEACH: The Milagro Center Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

February 12, 2017

Update: DPR, Spotify & Rebuilding Together Create a Drumbeat of Change at Kealing Middle School

A drumbeat of change has swept over Kealing Middle School in the past year, ever since DPR teamed up with Spotify and Rebuilding Together to deliver a brand-new sound studio project to the magnet school located in an economically disadvantaged area of Austin, Texas.

In the wake of the annual South by Southwest (SXSW) festival held last spring, Spotify wanted to make a lasting, positive impact on the Austin community, and decided to donate the extensive sound equipment, furniture and art from its popular SXSW “Spotify House” to a local school’s music program. Spotify reached out to Rebuilding Together to help find the right school and team to deliver its vision.


DPR teamed up with Spotify and Rebuilding together to create a brand-new sound studio at Kealing Middle School. (Photo courtesy: Spotify)

Longtime partners, Rebuilding Together brought DPR on board to help design and build three brand new recording lab studios that would house the Spotify-donated equipment. Kealing Middle School, a magnet school and comprehensive academy in a diverse, under-resourced neighborhood, was the perfect fit. It already had a modern, organized music program in place and a strong vision for how it could grow.

Last March, DPR project manager Angie Weyant called the project a “major undertaking” involving DPR’s donation of approximately $25,000 in materials and labor to build the new sound studio over the school’s spring break.

“The best part was being able to use our core skills doing what we do every day to help youth in our local community,” she said. “That was pretty awesome.”


Kealing Middle School students are now able to create and record their own music. (Photo courtesy: Spotify)

Less than a year later, the project has already had a profound impact on the students and the programs offered at the school, according to Kealing Middle School Principal Kenisha Coburn. In addition to increasing the number of students who could be accommodated in existing music classes, the new sound studio space spurred the start of new after-school clubs for students who want to create and record music.

A new robotics program added this year is also tying into the production studio capabilities in an innovative way, with students able to program robots to perform pieces that they’ve created on their music production systems.

The school has seen some financial savings resulting from the project as well; students in the music production program now DJ school dances that they once hired an outside DJ to do. The enhanced collaboration by students in different classes, working together on diverse projects, has been another major, positive impact–enhancing the learning experience of all.


The studio space has created collaboration between music, video production and graphic design students. (Photo courtesy: Spotify)

“We are using the studio space to embed more of the work that happens on our campus into collaborative projects,” said Coburn. “A lot of groups are coming in from outside of the music production program, and they go in and collaborate with the music production students in a way that they couldn’t do here before. So, for example our news team that is charged with creating a weekly news story for campus is able to use studio space and work with music production students to record audio that is part of the weekly news now. And our music production students are learning to work with our graphic design students so they can provide soundtracks to some of the pieces they make in video production, which is a big undertaking.”

Overall, she adds, “the impact has been big. To be able to get studio-grade space that not only allows the students to grow inside of music production, but also allows them to bring in other groups and collaborate with them, has been pretty special.”

January 11, 2017

DPR Volunteers Put Heart, Building Skills into REINS Facility

A group of DPR volunteers who helped construct a shade structure for REINS Therapeutic Horsemanship Program in Fallbrook, California brought much more than just their construction expertise to the project, which will benefit disabled individuals in their community.

They also brought plenty of heart.

The community initiative effort involved members of the Campus Point Building 2 project as well as HOK Architects, Hope-Amundson and several subcontractors. Collectively, they delivered a project to benefit the REINS program, which provides hundreds of disabled children and adults from Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties with physical, mental and emotional support through therapeutic equine-assisted activities.

The need for this particular project came to light earlier this year as the team was looking for an opportunity to tap their core expertise in a way that would have a lasting and positive impact on the local community. They had raised money for REINS through a cornhole event, but wanted to find a meaningful way to use their unique skillsets as builders–and found it when they discovered REINS needed a shading structure to protect children and families from weather when mounting and dismounting horses.


A DPR team gathered to build a shading structure for REINS Therapeutic Horsemanship Program in Fallbrook, California. (Photo courtesy: Debbie Shinner)

Last month, the team built the structure over the course of a day, with several following up at a later date to install the roof. Altogether, DPR volunteers put in an estimated nearly 120 volunteer hours, with the design team contributing an additional 40 hours or so to complete the job. The wood structure brings a highly functional, aesthetically pleasing new element to the REINS facility that has been met with widespread enthusiasm by the organization and its clients.

“I just can’t tell you all the wonderful comments we are getting on the project,” said Debbie Shinner, executive director at REINS. “The entire DPR team was so kind and considerate, and we are so very grateful for all the time and energy they put into the project.”

Building the structure in the midst of students who were passing by let volunteers truly see the positive impact the facility would have.

“It inspired us to do an even better job,” said DPR’s Dora Kaouki. “Everybody came together, and we not only put our expertise into the project, but we also put our hearts.”

Just one example of the “heart” that went in: project superintendent John McDougall came back after the first December build day and decorated the new structure with poinsettias and a wreath. 

December 21, 2016

DPR Builds Bridge to Community with Mission Solano Women’s & Children’s Shelter

DPR’s Northbay Medical Center project team recently put its building skills to good use in Fairfield, California, delivering a much-needed flooring renovation at Mission Solano’s Bridge to Life Center, a holistic program that houses and assists homeless veterans and families.

The volunteer project infused a “breath of fresh air” into Mission Solano’s Matt Garcia Home for Women and Children, according to chief program officer Raymond Courtemanche. “There is new movement, energy and feeling valued (by our residents) by taking care of the place that they live in, where they receive compassionate care,” he said. “DPR helped start this movement of support for this building that will help us get to capacity. The DPR team was just amazing in their support, generosity and synergy, in partnering with us to complete this work.”


DPR installed new flooring throughout the Mission Solano women's and children's center. 

The DPR team had been looking for a project that would use their unique skillset as builders to benefit the community when the center contacted them this fall for help installing new flooring throughout its women and children’s center. DPR project manager Stephanie Jones-Lee spearheaded the effort, bringing in subcontractors to assist with donating and installing new carpets and wood bases for the sleeping dorms, family lounges, family sleeping quarters and nursery areas. DPR donated approximately $5,000 in materials and labor, and four project team members spent several days installing the wood base.

The project’s completion enables Mission Solano to pursue its mission of providing not only transitional residential housing but also holistic care for up to 68 residents in the women and children’s shelter alone. The organization also provides services to veterans and others in need.

“We provide an economic and spiritual bridge so that people can strive to regain the basic necessities in their lives, and join the community as full and active participants,” said Courtemanche.


DPR volunteers infused a “breath of fresh air” into Mission Solano’s Matt Garcia Home for Women and Children.

December 8, 2016

DPR Dallas Team Educates Students about Construction Career Paths

Approximately 60 students at an under-resourced high school in Dallas got an inside look at the diverse opportunities in the construction industry, thanks to an effort led by DPR volunteers to engage youth through educational outreach both inside and outside the classroom.

Casey Cox, a concrete project engineer with DPR’s self-perform work group, helped spearhead the outreach effort geared toward students at Woodrow Wilson High School. Drawing from his own past experience working with a high school youth ministry, Cox worked to accomplish the effort’s overall goal: to apply one of DPR’s key tenets of making a difference and helping build the future workforce through career and education guidance to local youth.


DPR's Brendan Hastings teaches a class about construction innovation at Woodrow Wilson High School in Dallas. (Photo courtesy: Brendan Hastings)

“We wanted to partner with a strong STEM school to bring DPR’s work into the classroom, as well as give the students an opportunity to experience a day-in-the-life by taking them out to one of our actual jobsites,” said Cox. “Taking the time to expose these students to what it’s like working in the real world around industry professionals provided insight on a career in the construction business, and more importantly, spurred confidence as they consider life after graduation.”

Cox reached out to the Digital Realty Trust team to be part of this community initiative, which so far has included two in-class lessons and a jobsite tour. DPR project manager Brendan Hastings led the first classroom presentation on innovation and technology in the construction industry, where he spoke to about 60 students in Woodrow Wilson’s architecture and civil engineering class in early November.


Students from Woodrow Wilson High School tour a DPR project site in the Dallas area. (Photo courtesy: Brad Barton)

After the first classroom presentation, students visited the Digital Realty data center project in the Dallas area. They not only had the chance to experience an active construction project firsthand, but were also able to hear from various workers about their jobs and pathways into the industry. The DPR team enjoyed the students’ genuine curiosity and articulate questions.

DPR volunteers returned after Thanksgiving to deliver a second lesson focused on MEP (Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing) coordination, and plan to keep coming back to spotlight different aspects of construction, as they use our work building great things to help educate the leaders of tomorrow.

November 7, 2016

DPR and the Batchelor Foundation Team Up to Build ‘Creation Station’ for Florida Teens

New hands-on learning opportunities that combine creativity and cutting-edge technology will soon be just a click away for over three dozen south Florida teens, thanks to a new Creation Station center that enables them to produce and edit audio and video recordings on demand.

DPR teamed up with the Batchelor Foundation to deliver the highly anticipated audio/visual recording center project at Milagro Center in Delray Beach, which serves economically disadvantaged youth in the region. Both longtime contributors to the organization, DPR provided materials and labor to renovate and equip a soundproof room that will house software and equipment provided by the Batchelor Foundation through a grant.

The Creation Station room renovation included designing, assembling and installing numerous large, multicolored acoustic panels, strategically placed for maximum visual effect. This fall, about ten DPR volunteers spent an afternoon creating and installing the panels, aided by a handful of Milagro Center teens who were inspired to help.


At the Milagro Center, DPR volunteers build the Creation Station, an audio/visual recording space, for Florida teens. (Photo courtesy: Adriana Martinengo-Rosenberg)

Luke Stocking, DPR’s liaison to the Milagro Center, said the teens are looking forward to designing and producing their own original videos using a big screen, computer software and audio equipment in the soundproofed, custom-renovated room. The only other Creation Station in Palm Beach County is at the Main Branch library, 25 miles north of Milagro Center – and it usually has a waitlist of two weeks to use that equipment.

Even more important than the “cool” factor of being able to make multimedia videos in their own after-school center, however, are the practical skills the Milagro Center teens will gain from doing so.


When complete, the Creation Station at the Milagro Center will provide teens with technical skills they can use in the workforce. (Photo courtesy: Adriana Martinengo-Rosenberg)

“The big picture is that it gives them technical, professional skills they can use in the workforce,” said Stocking. “These teens will get hands-on experience with the software, the technology and the equipment at their own center, whenever they want to use it.”

The Creation Station will be completed this month.

“The teens can’t wait to start using the Creation Station,” said Anthony Bacchus, director of the Milagro Center. “DPR has made a major impact at the teen center over the years, giving the teens confidence and knowledge about careers in construction. Sponsors and parents are truly inspired by DPR’s involvement with the center and the community.”

October 5, 2016

DPR Atlanta Volunteers Deliver Big Makeover to Boys & Girls Club Facility

Sporting fresh paint, an updated teen center, and new garden and kitchen features to support farm-to-table cooking classes, the Brookhaven Boys & Girls Club in Metropolitan Atlanta is ready to welcome more teens into their program – all thanks to a major facelift completed by DPR volunteers in September.

More than 20 DPR Atlanta employees put their professional skills to good use during the “Service September” makeover project, donating an estimated 250 volunteer hours and $4,500 in materials to complete the needed renovation.

The project included:

  • Moving the teen room to a new location within the center
  • Completely repainting the facility
  • Constructing new garden planter boxes where teens can grow their own fruits and vegetables
  • Donating and assembling a compost facility and a movable kitchen island for use in the teen center


DPR volunteers completely repainted the Brookhaven Boys & Girls Club's teen room in Atlanta. (Photo courtesy Andi King)

Volunteer coordinator Andi King serves on the board of the DeKalb County arm of the Boys & Girls Club of Metro Atlanta, and worked with the organization to identify a project that needed DPR’s unique skill set as technical builders.

DPR self-perform work crews, particularly Jay Campbell and Chris Jones, were instrumental in bringing the project to fruition.

“From the job walk to getting the self-perform guys there, to hardcore woodworking, we couldn’t have done it without them,” said King.

Ziggy Asfaw, executive director of the Brookhaven Boys & Girls Club, said the project is already having a big impact on the approximately 160 children who use the facility for after-school activities each day, including more than 30 teens who are regulars.


The DPR Atlanta team built new planter boxes, where teens will be able to grow their own fruits and vegetables. (Photo courtesy Andi King)

The makeover will help the club expand its mission to serve more youth in the community, while empowering those who already have been using the center.

“DPR has helped us give the teens more reason to want to be at the club. When members feel as though the club is a place they can call their own, they are empowered to serve the community and have a sense of belonging. With support and the feeling that they are cared for, the teens tend to pay it forward,” said Asfaw. 

October 2, 2016

DPR Volunteers Make Big Impact During ‘Service September’

For the entire month of September, DPR teams across the country took their construction skills into the communities in which we serve to support nonprofit organizations through facility renovation and repair.  

Approximately 65 employees in the Bay Area, ranging from tradespeople to senior leadership, came together on Sept. 10 with Rebuilding Together, an organization that aims to transform the lives of low-income homeowners by improving the safety and health of their homes. DPR’s Bay Area region delivered four different hands-on construction projects that underscored its commitment to giving back.

The projects – which included making improvements to an elementary school in Belmont, a historic community building in Oakland and community centers in San Francisco and San Jose – shared a common thread:  all touch the lives of a broad number of people in the communities in which they were located. Together, the projects benefited thousands of students, special needs adults and local citizens.


At the I.T. Bookman Center in San Francisco, DPR made facility improvements that will enable it to act as a disaster response shelter. (Photo courtesy: Rena Crittendon)

Rena Crittendon organized the service events in the Bay Area and personally championed the San Francisco project. “This year we wanted to concentrate our efforts on community centers or other projects that make an impact on a bigger group of people, and to take on tougher projects that required our unique skills as technical builders,” she said.

At San Francisco’s I.T. Bookman Center, which serves over 1,500 individuals annually through community programs, DPR made improvements that will enable it to operate as a disaster response shelter. The project was one component of a larger, ongoing neighborhood revitalization effort.

“DPR’s involvement was critical to our improvement program. The DPR team served as the tip of the ‘rebuilding sword’ at I.T. Bookman Community Center,” said Rebuilding Together San Francisco’s Jennifer Leshnower. “In just one day, a team of DPR volunteers completed the wall and floor demolition necessary to launch a multiphase kitchen remodeling project.”

A team of more than 20 DPR volunteers provided all the materials and manpower for work that included painting, installing a brick paver patio, landscaping, as well as removing extensive debris and clutter from three local homes.


DPR volunteers clear brush from the garden of the Cohen Bray House, a historic home in Oakland, built in 1884. (Photo courtesy: Simon Eldridge)

In three other Bay Area communities, DPR volunteers took on equally challenging and vital service projects during the Sept. 10 day of service, including:

  • Grace Community Center, San Jose – DPR’s Nick Garzini championed improvements for a community center serving adults with special needs in the South Bay. A wide spectrum of volunteers from various self-perform work divisions (doors, concrete and interiors) and subcontracting partners performed hands-on construction work. The team painted the exterior, and replaced numerous aspects of the center, including stairs, toilets, doors and lights. “The work is amazing – you have changed and affected a lot of people’s lives,” commented Debbie Reynolds from Grace Community Center after the workday. “Thank you from the bottom of my heart!”
  • Cohen Bray House Museum, Oakland – A DPR team championed by Simon Eldridge restored a historic Victorian house museum, an Oakland city landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. The team made improvements including new railings and fencing, exterior paint and a cleaned garden.
  • Nesbit Elementary School, Belmont – A dozen volunteers demolished and replaced cabinets in five classrooms for an elementary school serving almost 600 students on the Peninsula.