Eve R. Forward
DPR's Roving Reporter

Eve R. Forward

Eve R. Forward is DPR Construction's roving reporter. Born in 1990 in Redwood City, Eve lives and breathes DPR...Literally.

Posts: 183
Location: Redwood City, California
Favorite core value: Ever Forward, naturally! I was named after this core value.
Hometown: I was born in Redwood City, but now I live all over the country.
Best part of the job: Asking the hard-hitting questions that need answers.
Posts In: Construction Technologies, Healthcare, Higher Education, Life Sciences, Making Milestones, Safety, Sustainability, If These Walls Could Talk


July 9, 2020

Leveraging Prefab to Minimize Impact on Hospital Operations

DPR Construction used prefabricated modules from Digital Building Components to build temporary bypass hallways to minimize the impact of construction at a major hospital in the Phoenix area. The expansion project will add approximately 580,000 sq. ft. to the existing hospital building, with construction to be completed adjacent to the current Emergency Department (ED).

“We needed to perform major construction work while the busy emergency department remained functional,” said DPR project manager Mike Cummings. “Patients and staff needed access to the hospital, but the building expansion couldn’t be completed without moving the entrances.”

Hallway module lifted into place at Phoenix hospital
A hallway module is suspended via crane and guided into place at the Arizona hospital. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

The enclosed walkways routed pedestrian traffic to the hospital’s entrances, allowing patients to access critical care services while reducing disruptions. One hallway provides public access to the ED while the other provides ambulance and helipad personnel access.

With a combined length of approximately 700 ft. and interior dimensions of 8 ft. x 8 ft., each hallway was designed to ensure the comfort and safety of those who use them throughout the two and half years of the construction project. The prefabricated hallways meet stringent code requirements including a two-hour fire-resistance rating in the case of an emergency.

Several building methods were considered for the hallways. Cummings said the project team looked at traditional onsite construction, onsite fabrication, and offsite fabrication. All three options had similar costs, so the project team looked more closely at other factors: safety, on-time delivery, and impact to the hospital staff and patients.

The project team chose offsite prefabrication with components manufactured by Digital Building Components to best meet customer needs. Specifically, this method was projected to reduce the overall schedule by an estimated three weeks. The onsite team could pour concrete foundations to support the module components while the hallway sections – fitted with mechanical, electrical, and HVAC elements – were built in the fabrication shop.

“It took a lot of detailed and upfront coordination with our trade partners, but we were able to cut the installation time in half from what was anticipated for a traditional ‘stick-built’ system,” said Cummings. “This meant less disruption to patients and hospital operations.”

He notes that prefabrication wasn’t used for the entire passageway. The project team analyzed existing conditions and determined that a traditional construction method was more appropriate at the ends of the hallways. Canopies at the connections to the building meant cranes couldn’t drop the modules into place, so those sections were built conventionally. “We used prefabrication where it made the most sense and increased our productivity,” explained Cummings.

The productivity during installation far exceeded expectations and showed off the benefits to building some components offsite. Digital Building installed roughly 12 units a day and completed 47 in four days totaling roughly 520 linear feet with a crew of four. In the end, using prefabrication sped up completion of the temporary hallways by about five weeks and reduced onsite labor by approximately 2400 worker hours.

“We had been considering prefabricating other elements on the hospital too,” said Cummings. “After the successful hallway installation, the value was clear. We received customer approval to move forward with prefabricating the exterior wall panels.”

Crane lifting prefabricated hallway module
A crane lifts the prefabricated hallway module for installation. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

July 1, 2020

Virtual Design and Construction Proves Its Worth in a Changing Environment

Across the country, DPR teams are virtually building projects using cloud-based solutions in conjunction with web platforms to seamlessly collaborate remotely.

The COVID-19 pandemic has left few industries or individuals untouched. Construction companies have reacted by adapting workflows to continue to deliver projects for their clients. From pre-screening all who enter to requiring masks and social distancing once on-site, the jobsite of today looks much different than it did a mere six months ago. Many companies, including DPR Construction, are leveraging virtual design and construction (VDC) methods to navigate workflow constraints resulting from disruptions.

“Site logistics and visual planning have taken on even more critical roles,” said Hannu Lindberg, national VDC leader at DPR. “With the ongoing necessity to maintain a healthy distance from other team members, an extra layer of planning has become vital to ensure predictable outcomes on schedule.”

As ever, the devil is in the details. Any successful construction project is built on layers of well thought out planning for every scope of work. Leveraging data from the model to inform workflow planning inevitably leads to other adjustments in work methods to keep projects going.

Using the model to preplan allows more efficient work planning and reduces re-work.

Building Projects in the Cloud

In any circumstance, teams employ virtual models to solve problems before moving into the field, as well as to respond to changes that arise once work has begun. Using the model to preplan allows more efficient work planning and reduces re-work. While important in any situation, it is critical when managing limited crew sizes such as the ones seen on jobsites today.

VDC, by nature, is extremely compatible with a remote working environment. Across the country, DPR teams are virtually building projects using cloud-based solutions like BIM Track and Autodesk BIM 360 in conjunction with web platforms like StructionSite to seamlessly collaborate, share ideas and create content to navigate constraints posed by the pandemic.

One large healthcare project in Southern California successfully transitioned from on-site co-location to remote meetings during preconstruction and design as a result of high engagement and reliance on the VDC process. By leveraging an Integrated Project Delivery approach, the project team can complete design and coordination simultaneously, with trades working alongside design partners in the model to problem solve in real-time. The process has been so efficient that the project received California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) approval on first review, where typically, multiple rounds of review are needed to solve issues flagged. As the team moves into construction, VDC will continue to play a heavy role for as-built verification, among other needs.

A tower under construction in Austin has a total area of more than 1,500,000 sq. and is the largest DPR self-perform concrete project to date.

Planning for Limited Exposure

While defining locations isn’t a new concept, creating specified work zones is critical in a heightened environment to maximize efficiency while maintaining distance.

“Needs related to site logistics; ingress, egress and wayfinding; and the deployment and use of different work zones can be better addressed by using data obtained from the model,” said Lindberg. “With this data serving as real-time feedback, it’s possible to adapt to changing field conditions and meet new environmental, health and safety requirements while still maintaining productivity.”

Having those needs top of mind has been key to keeping one DPR project on track: an office tower being constructed in the booming downtown of Austin, Texas. The 35-story, 590-ft. tall high-rise has a total area of more than 1,500,000 sq. ft. and includes 1,390 parking stalls in both above and below-grade parking. It’s the largest vertical high-rise concrete structure that DPR has ever built and its largest self-perform (SPW) concrete project to date—thereby necessitating better planning to meet increased distancing protocols. Prefabricated components include restroom plumbing assemblies and the iconic, sail-inspired, unitized curtainwall system.

Luckily, a VDC-enabled workforce has incorporated a high level of building information modeling into nearly every aspect of the project, from the detailed model used to coordinate and construct the exterior curtainwall, to DPR’s best-in-class SPW concrete team using VDC to optimize planning and sequencing.

“From top to bottom, the team has embraced VDC tools on every aspect of the work,” said DPR Central VDC leader, Jacob Skrobarczyk. “We are intentionally focused on using VDC for self-perform concrete to improve communication, plan production and ensure we hit our targets while keeping our craft safe.”

“The more planning and prefab we can do the less exposure our teams have in the field. As we transition from the structure to the skin to the interiors, clear communication on where and when each team is working in an area is more important than ever,” Skrobarczyk added.

One thing is certain: more real-time data flowing into and out of the model allows teams to execute with a greater level of certainty. Above and beyond delivering projects that are technically sound and built right for customers, these methods also ensure teams do right by their people in the field too.

June 9, 2020

If These Walls Could Talk... They'd Say VDC Gets Results

Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) processes deliver value and foster predictable outcomes on almost every project that DPR executes. These processes are especially valuable when applied to the extremely complex and interconnected mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) systems.

In the latest installment of “If These Walls Could Talk…,” a few of DPR’s MEP professionals discuss how VDC processes allow them to recognize and mitigate constructability issues in the virtual world so they don’t materialize in the real one.

May 7, 2020

To Those Who Selflessly Care for Others, Thank You and Happy Mother's Day

Healthcare workers are called to serve a cause greater than themselves. They take care of those who are in need, often working 12-hour days with no breaks. And the mothers among them don’t stop when they clock out. They continue their service once they get home to their families, doing everything from helping kids with remote learning to giving comforting hugs.

This Mother’s Day and National Nurses Week, DPR would like to recognize the family and friends of our employees who are medical professionals and put in long hours both at work and at home. We offer our deepest gratitude to those of you who are always there to comfort us, whether at home or in the patient room, and especially in the midst of the greatest healthcare crisis of the century. We trust you with our lives, and we thank you for your compassion and expertise.

Following are a few testaments about the people we are fortunate to have in our lives:

April 24, 2020

What's the Word: Navigating Disruption

DPR Construction values the health, safety and well-being of its employees, families, customers, partners and communities. In light of the COVID-19 public health crisis, DPR created a dedicated task force and business continuity teams to address the situation, taking guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the World Health Organization and other public agencies.

The interests of customers and projects are best served by working together with all stakeholders to prevent or mitigate the impacts. DPR's goals are to listen and respond to customer needs, take care of people and proceed on projects safely.

Following is a key question asked to some employees:

How is your team adjusting and collaborating to continue supporting our people and projects?

Photo courtesy of David Hardman

“The profound sense of community and seeing everyone pull together across DPR to connect, support and take care of each other is inspiring. The way we stay in touch and meet with each other has shifted across the company. Now, virtual meetings have evolved to more closely resemble the depth of connection experienced from in-person meetings. It has led to more personalized connection, empathy and vulnerability that I am so grateful for. It reminds me of how special our people are.”

Derek Kirkland, People Growth and Development Leader

Photo courtesy of David Hardman

“As we adjust under COVID-19, client and industry communications have also increased to support our front-line heroes in the medical community. We realize that there is not a one-size fits-all solution to current conditions. Our teams continue to move forward and accommodate requests from the healthcare systems we serve, and seek ways to advance projects, create space and support the medical community.”

Sean Ashcroft, Core Market Leader, Healthcare

DPR Construction cloth face coverings jobsite
In accordance with CDC recommendations, DPR is requiring cloth face coverings to be worn on jobsites to ensure the safety and health of DPR’s employees, customers, partners and communities.
DPR Construction foreman meeting social distacing
In the early stages of the crisis, a project team in Southern California adapted its foreman meeting to follow CDC guidelines by placing boards outside. Only one person moved notes to keep planning going. Photo courtesy of Jean Laurent
DPR Construction virtual meeting social distance
As many staff started working remotely to comply with regional orders, group huddles with team members who needed to remain on jobsites became the new norm. Photo courtesy of David Cox
As an ongoing effort, DPR is implementing a prescreening process at all jobsites. Anyone entering the site is screened to ensure they are not showing possible signs of illness.
DPR uses non-invasive means of taking temperature as part of its jobsite screening process.
DPR Construction EHS advanced protocols
Signage, additional personal protective equipment and onsite screening are some of the extra safety protocols DPR has implemented on its jobsites. Photo courtesy of Tom Bicksler
DPR Construction Southwest SPW webinar
DPR’s Southwest region held an online webinar for its self-perform work group, with more than 50 project managers, superintendents, project engineers and estimators joining to discuss ow COVID- 19 has impacted the region’s people and projects. Photo courtesy of Eric Cusick

April 22, 2020

Earth Day 2020: Data that Counts in the Built Environment

We love the things we build, and we care about how we build them. While the world has changed in recent months, the importance of the built environment and high-performing spaces remains the same.

Since completing its first LEED-certified project twenty years ago, DPR Construction’s approach to sustainability and wellness centers on collaboration and data-driven decision-making. DPR leverages integrated project delivery to reduce waste of all sorts throughout the construction process, and it has proven true triple bottom line benefits for customers, communities and employees.

This Earth Day, DPR is taking stock of its impacts on the planet and communities where it operates and reflecting on the environmental performance of its office operations, especially the observation that high-performance buildings at market rates are realistic.

Biophilic design encourages connection to the natural world and can reduce stress while increasing productivity, creativity and wellbeing. Photo courtesy of Peter Molick

Lessons from Living Labs

Anyone who has worked on an office renovation knows the importance of setting a vision for the design. But meeting project goals and making informed decisions – while preserving the budget –takes data and experience.

Testing out leading-edge design and construction methods is the primary driver behind DPR’s “Living Labs,” which are new and renovated regional offices that DPR brings online. Each office is an opportunity to think about space differently, and to set goals not only for functionality and effectiveness, but also comfort and enjoyment.

With each Living Lab completion, there’s more evidence that renovations can be done to high performance standards and competitive rates, and that sustainable design and construction works in every climate. These offices endorse multiple green building rating systems, including LEED, WELL, Fitwell and ILFI Zero Energy certification, and DPR intends to scale up certifications across future offices. Each one employs a unique combination of green strategies, but some features standout:

Photo courtesy of David Hardman
  • San Diego: The DPR San Diego office used a broad-based natural daylighting strategy which includes Solatubes and south facing roof monitors, which reduce overall lighting requirements. As a result, the building performs 97% better than similarly modeled buildings.
  • Phoenix: DPR’s Phoenix office was the second office in the U.S. to achieve net-zero energy certification and incorporates several passive heating/cooling solutions. These include including 87 operable windows and a stack ventilation system which draws air up and out through the building.
  • San Francisco: As the first net-zero energy building in the city, the San Francisco office is a textbook case on adaptive reuse. Unique circumstances included no space between buildings, cast shadows, and the need to “right-size” the roof PV system for foggy weather and structure upgrades.
  • Washington D.C.: In aiming for net-zero energy status, the team leading the DPR Washington, D.C. office used a combination of passive and active strategies first and then focused on offsetting with a 141kW rooftop PV system, which more than makes up for the building’s minimal insulation loss.
  • Austin: Living walls are one of the most noticeable elements of DPR’s Austin office, which is the first WELL-certified building in the city. Biophilic design encourages connection to the natural world and can reduce stress while increasing productivity, creativity and wellbeing.
  • Sacramento: The relocation and renovation of DPR’s Sacramento office included a 6,000-sq.-ft. mass timber addition – the first cross-laminated timber (CLT) structure in the city. CLT panels were prefabbed to reduce onsite waste, and timber requires less energy to produce and has lower embodied carbon.

Look to the Data

Each office employs different techniques to achieve and maintain its green performance status because technology, systems and equipment are constantly evolving. And more than ever before, there are tools available to demonstrate that environmental performance equates to business and financial returns.

DPR partners with Lucid to optimize building performance and metrics tracking. The Lucid BuildingOS system allows for monitoring and sharing building water and power consumption, and photovoltaic energy production in real time. In the last 12 months, five representative DPR offices produced 448,751 kWh from PV installations, and consumed approximately 601, 116 kWh – making up nearly 75 percent of the energy used. As DPR continues to expand its use of the dashboard, keeping track of stats over time will help the organization figure out strategies for further reduction, and continually optimize its offices.

Living Labs may be the first space where DPR tests new approaches to sustainability, but the data on cost and performance provide reference points for all building owners seeking to achieve big results at market rate.

March 23, 2020

The Power of Prefab

Prefabricated panels manufactured by DBC are installed on a jobsite. Photo courtesy of Chip Allen Photography

The construction industry is developing new methods and improving productivity in response to customer needs, technological advances and labor-related challenges. Prefabrication is at the forefront of this evolution, delivering high-quality projects with lower costs and accelerated schedules.

For some, the term ‘prefabricated’ may spark memories of manufactured housing from the last century. But the prefabricated components used in construction today blend seamlessly into completed buildings and contribute to an efficient workflow.

“Concepts like DfMA—design for manufacture and assembly—and DIMC—designing for industrialized methods of construction—are on the rise,” said DPR’s Ray Boff.

According to Buildoffsite, DfMA, in its simplest terms, is “the application of factory (or factory like) conditions to construction projects” and almost always includes prefabricated components. Parts of the structure are manufactured offsite in a controlled environment. These pieces are then delivered to the jobsite and hoisted into place for assembly.

“DIMC evaluates how available building components can be programmatically arranged and procured in the most efficient ways to provide cost and schedule certainty, along with improved design and construction quality,” said Boff. “Both concepts support concurrent engineering methodology.

Prefabricated components used in construction today blend seamlessly into completed buildings and contribute to an efficient workflow. Photo courtesy of Chip Allen Photography

Custom Prefab

But what about creativity? Does building with prefabricated components restrict customization in design? Not at DPR.

“Each project is a blank canvas,” said DPR’s Bryan McCaffrey. “Through the use of virtual design and construction, and the data-rich model produced through the VDC process, we have the ability to digitally fabricate custom components.”

DPR works with Digital Building Components, located in Phoenix, AZ, to digitally fabricate precise-to-spec building assemblies directly from the building information model (BIM), including load-bearing panelized structures, fully finished panelized exterior walls and panelized interior walls with electrical and plumbing already roughed in.

The key to integrating prefabrication is to include it from the beginning of the design process. DPR collaborates with customers, architects and engineers to determine if prefabrication makes sense and how best to include it. This helps ensure that the project will run smoothly. It also avoids the challenges arising from inserting prefab into an existing design.

Prefab requires fewer workers, provides a safer work environment, and offers consistency. Photo courtesy of DPR Construction

Key Benefits

Incorporating prefab into a project’s design can yield the following advantages:

  • Higher Quality: Digitally fabricating components in a factory-controlled environment improves quality control. Machines create precision products directly from the model and deliver components that fit as expected in the field.
  • Cost Certainty: Materials are batched, and waste is reduced or eliminated. Factory-based labor offers greater predictability that results in higher productivity, safer working environments and cost advantages. According to Buildoffsite, site labor costs about 2.2 times as much as factory labor and factory productivity is about double that on jobsites.
  • Accelerated Schedules: Panels are manufactured in parallel with work done in the field. This leads to earlier project completion. Weather doesn’t affect factory production and thus becomes less of a factor.
  • Improved Labor Resources: A 2019 survey by AGC found that “80% of contractors report difficulty finding qualified craft workers.” Prefab requires fewer workers, provides a safer work environment, and offers consistency – making jobs in the prefab sector among the most attractive in the construction labor force. Controlled environments also allow for cross-training in specific tasks, which helps in labor balancing, skills enhancement and workforce improvement across the board.
  • Sustainability: According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), “About 40% of solid waste in the United States derives from construction and demolition.” Prefab batches production and takes place in a controlled environment, substantially reducing or eliminating waste. It also reduces the number of vehicles traveling to and from the jobsite, thereby reducing the consumption of fossil fuels and their associated emissions.
  • Other job-specific advantages: Jobsite constraints are becoming more common. Prefabrication minimizes the number of workers required on-site. According to Sam Huckaby of Vantage, having fewer people on the jobsite was a significant benefit of using prefab. “We were a constrained site from a parking and access perspective, so the more work we were able to do offsite, the better, especially when something is wrapping the entire building…”
Building 1 on the Vantage McLaren Santa Clara data center site was DPR’s first use of pre-finished EIFS panels from Digital Building Components. Photo courtesy of Daniel Peak Photography

Prefab in Action

The 175,000-sq.-ft. Building 1 on the Vantage McLaren Santa Clara data center site was DPR’s first use of pre-finished EIFS panels from Digital Building Components. The digitally fabricated exterior panels allowed the team to enclose the building nearly 12 weeks earlier than if it had been stick-built.

In a series of higher education projects in California, DPR also provided prefabricated steel panels in place of wood framing, without increasing the owner’s cost. According to the owner, the projects realized the following benefits by including prefab:

  • Efficiency of construction
  • Improved schedule
  • A stronger, better product for the same cost.

Ultimately, the power of prefab is in the value to the customer. Prefab methods speed up construction schedules while also providing high quality at a lower cost. As the effects of the COVID-19 crisis continue to unfold, DPR is actively working with design and prefab partners to support the healthcare community with rapidly deployable solutions to help increase capacity and other needs as they arise for individual customers.

March 19, 2020

If These Walls Could Talk… They'd Say MEP Can Affect OpEx

Construction costs a lot, but so does keeping a building running for 50 years… or longer! Upgrading systems later is also costly and disruptive to building tenants or owners. There are more tools than ever to address these issues, though.

By bringing experts in mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) construction to the table throughout a project – from design stages to execution in the field – customers can ensure their new facilities operate optimally, ideally supporting a lower total cost of ownership.

In the latest installment of “If These Walls Could Talk…,” DPR Construction MEP professionals describe how they collaborate with project partners and customers to deliver the best possible outcomes on every project.

March 11, 2020

At NIH project, prefabrication delivers quality on schedule

DPR marked a major milestone on a project underway for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. The Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL) Cell Processing Modular Facility, which will be used by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to deliver cutting-edge cancer treatment, is the first large-scale, fully prefabricated and modular multi-module cGMP manufacturing facility of its kind ever built in the United States.

DPR workers finalize installation of a modular unit at the NIH project.
DPR workers finalize installation of a modular unit at the NIH project. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin Photography

In early December, ten prefabricated modules began arriving on the NIH campus, the final stop on their journey from subcontractor Germfree’s Ormond Beach, Florida manufacturing facility. The modules, which span an average 14 x 40 feet each, include a cell processing suite, cleanroom lab space, a cold storage room, office and work spaces and more.

As the modules arrived on site and over the next couple of weeks, construction crews undertook an extremely complex rigging procedure to move the modules into place. It involved a carefully choreographed sequence of rigging and hoisting the 40,000- to 50,000-pound modules some 35 to 40 feet into the air, over the structural steel exterior building envelope and through the open roof to set them in place on their foundations.

Magnifying the challenge, the entire operation took place a mere 40 feet from two adjacent, fully operational medical and research buildings. Vibration monitoring required close coordination with users in adjacent buildings to ensure that sensitive activities were not affected. “The logistics of planning the rigging was extremely complex,” commented DPR Project Executive Jeff Vertucci. He noted that the decision to construct the building’s exterior structural steel frame prior to installing the modules – essentially building the structure from the outside in – helped the team keep to schedule even as elements of the project changed. It is just one example of the solution-oriented approach adopted by the DPR-led design-build team working in concert with Germfree, architect Perkins & Will, and owner/end user, NIH and NCI.

The DPR team prepares a modular unit to be hoisted into the NIH structure.
DPR worked with its design-build team to develop a complex rigging plan that helped ensure project schedule. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin Photography

“We were already well into design and planning when we collaborated with our customer to recalibrate the scope for NIH, while also retaining a schedule that met their needs,” Vertucci said. “By enclosing the building and getting structural steel erected before the modules showed up, then reworking a rigging plan to drop the modules in through the roof, it made the rigging much more challenging but allowed us to save at least three months versus a traditional approach.”

That solution worked so well that NIH has asked DPR to re-sequence another job they are currently building on campus, the six-module CCDTM project, using the same approach, according to Vertucci. This DTM Modular Facility is using the same Germfree components as the TIL Facility.

Groundbreaking Technology

As DPR’s seventh project either underway or completed on the NIH campus, the TIL facility is a groundbreaking project in the world of cancer treatment. DPR Project Manager Ignacio Diaz said the facility’s lifesaving mission has provided the design and construction team extra motivation to work collaboratively and overcome an array of challenges in order to get the project up and running as quickly as possible.

“This is one of those jobs that did not need much outside influence to motivate people,” Diaz commented. “Cancer is such a common thing; virtually everybody is touched by it. The fact that we are building this facility that really impacts almost everybody is powerful. It gives us more incentive to finish fast so the end users, the researchers, can get to doing what they do – curing cancer, or at least helping to do so.”

A worker welds at the NIH project
A worker welds at the NIH project. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin Photography

Leveraging Expertise to Move Project Forward

With a footprint spanning approximately 6,000 sq. ft., the TIL Cell Processing Modular Facility is supported by an auger pile foundation drilled as deep as 30 feet. The structure has three levels: a bottom floor “crawl space” that follows the existing site slope, containing gas piping that includes the supplies of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) to the facility; a first floor comprising the 10 prefabricated modules; and a mechanical floor above. The mechanical level contains the building’s HVAC system, including two air handling units and two exhaust fans, electrical conduit for building controls and power systems, IT infrastructure and more.

Since being awarded the project in October 2017, DPR has leveraged its design management capabilities, its technical construction skills and its off-site construction management expertise to help keep the project moving forward while contending with underground utility rerouting, logistical challenges and tight site access, among other things. When the owner needed to make extensive programming changes to reconfigure the facility’s planned workflow during the design phase, DPR worked to re-sequence the project’s construction processes in order to make up some of the lost time.

Construction formally kicked off on the TIL Facility jobsite in August 2018, just two months after the off-site module prefabrication work was getting underway at Germfree’s Florida manufacturing plant.

An aerial view of the NIH project shows a modular unit in place inside the building.
From above, it's easy to see how the modular units piece together inside the structure. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin Photography

Modular Construction Delivers Quality Benefits

Off-site construction has provided significant quality and quality control benefits, according to Vertucci. Both the modules and the majority of the building systems were prefabricated off-site.

“I think ultimately NIH & NCI will end up with a phenomenally high-quality, state-of-the-art project when this is completed,” Vertucci commented. “Building this in a controlled environment in a warehouse manufacturing facility, by Germfree technicians who do this work all the time, makes the quality of what they are getting excellent.”

Adding to the quality control benefits, DPR is self-performing significant portions of the work with its own crews, including all exterior framing, sheeting, vapor barriers, doors, masonry and various other items.

Push Towards Completion

Following the arrival and installation of the 10 modules in December, the TIL project team will continue to make steady progress on the project during 2020. The project team also has an integrated commissioning plan which allows the owner’s Commissioning Qualification and Validation (CQV) agent to start with commissioning of systems as early as March 2020. This further allows for more time to work through the NIH document reviews that come with the cGMP facility requirements.

DPR is slated to complete all construction in Q2 2020 and have the CQV portion complete by Q3 2020, for turnover of the facility.

DPR is also handling all scientific equipment procurement on the project for the owner, a turnkey approach to project delivery that adds additional value for the client. This integrated approach ensures that DPR’s scientific equipment team will hand over a project with the necessary components needed for the research program the space is being used for.

February 20, 2020

DPR builds state-of-the-art academic building in Mesa, AZ

Arizona State University and City of Mesa leadership turn the ceremonial first shovels of dirt at the groundbreaking of the new ASU at Mesa City Center. Photo courtesy of DPR Construction

DPR Construction celebrated the start of construction for Arizona State University at Mesa City Center, the $73.5 million academic building on the university’s new campus set just east of Phoenix. Located downtown in the City of Mesa’s growing innovation district, the three-story building will be home to the ASU Creative Futures Laboratory and serve more than 750 students and faculty.

The 117,795-sq.-ft. facility will house programs that train students to work with emerging technologies including augmented reality, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and 3D design. The space is expected to enable students to hone their digital expertise and prepare for jobs within the region’s growing technology sector.

“We’re excited to continue our relationship working on world-class facilities with ASU, especially in this location in the downtown Mesa. We’ve witnessed the tremendous growth and energy that has developed in downtown Phoenix after the projects we’ve worked on with them and are looking forward to the same in downtown Mesa,” said DPR project manager Austin King.

The facility will house a 2,800-sq.-ft. enhanced immersion studio where users can create augmented realities and map virtual spaces onto physical environments. Construction is expected to be completed by late 2021.

Rendering of planned ASU facility in Mesa. Photo courtesy of Holly Street Studio and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson