Eve R. Forward
DPR's Roving Reporter

Eve R. Forward

Eve R. Forward is DPR Construction's roving reporter. Born in 1990 in Redwood City, Eve lives and breathes DPR...Literally.

Posts: 151
Location: Redwood City, California
Favorite core value: Ever Forward, naturally! I was named after this core value.
Hometown: I was born in Redwood City, but now I live all over the country.
Best part of the job: Asking the hard-hitting questions that need answers.
Posts In: Data Centers and Mission Critical, Healthcare, Higher Education, Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Lean, News, Safety, Making Milestones


July 5, 2018

Penn State University Celebrates Grand Reopening of Modernized Agricultural and Biological Engineering Building

PSU grand reopening
Penn State University (PSU) recently opened its newly modernized Agricultural Engineering Building, which houses the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE). Photo courtesy of Michael Houtz

Penn State University (PSU) recently opened its newly modernized Agricultural Engineering Building, which houses the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE) in the College of Agricultural Sciences. The ribbon cutting ceremony was held on June 8, 2018, giving PSU the opportunity to recognize the gifts and donations that made this facility a reality.

Home to some of the nation’s top architectural, engineering and building construction programs, PSU is incorporating Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) on this project, the first time the delivery method will be used on campus. The selection process began in the early summer of 2014, followed by PSU, DPR Construction, EYP Architecture & Engineering and mechanical and electrical subcontractors signing a multi-party IPD contract in 2015.

PSU lab
The Agricultural Engineering Building houses four multi-purpose classrooms, more than 30 comprehensive research and teaching labs, and several conference rooms and collaboration lounges. Photo courtesy of Michael Houtz

The two major components of this 93,500-sq.-ft. project are:

  • The modernization of the existing Charles Klauder building: built in 1938, the historic building needed major upgrades to meet safety and energy standards, as well as building needs.
  • The demolition of a 1960s addition to the building: In its place, the team constructed a new, replacement building, designed to match existing campus architecture.
PSU photo
With an energy efficient, open-concept design, the Agricultural Engineering Building is aiming to achieve LEED Silver certification. Photo courtesy of Michael Houtz

The Agricultural Engineering Building houses four multi-purpose classrooms, more than 30 comprehensive research and teaching labs, and several conference rooms and collaboration lounges. Agricultural engineering, with its diverse range of study, houses not only bio-chemistry laboratories, but machine shops, integrated hydrology-hydraulics laboratories and a new centralized fermentation laboratory.

With an energy efficient, open-concept design, the Agricultural Engineering Building is aiming to achieve LEED Silver certification through sustainable elements including a green roof, water conservation technology, renewable materials and use of natural light.

PSU lab
Agricultural engineering, with its diverse range of study, houses not only bio-chemistry laboratories, but machine shops, integrated hydrology-hydraulics laboratories and a new centralized fermentation laboratory. Photo courtesy of Michael Houtz

June 29, 2018

Celebrating the Topping Out of Crosstown Center Phase II in Tampa

In Tampa, the DPR team at Crosstown Center Phase II celebrated the completion of vertical structural steel construction with a traditional topping out ceremony this spring.

The corporate office campus will include a 5-story, 260,000-sq.-ft. core-and-shell office building with a 7-story, 1,260 space parking garage and connecting pedestrian bridge when it is complete in late 2018. Pursuing LEED Silver certification, the campus will leverage sustainable elements such as daylighting and recycling of 75 percent of construction waste.

More than 250 guests including design team members, subcontractors, craftspeople and owners enjoyed a barbecue lunch, presentation and ceremonial signing of the final beam to be raised into the structure. DPR thanked the subcontractors and construction crew for their hard work and dedication to maintaining a safe project site.

Crosstown rendering
The corporate office campus will include a 5-story, 260,000-sq.-ft. core-and-shell office building with a 7-story, 1,260 space parking garage and connecting pedestrian bridge when it is complete in late 2018 Photo courtesy of Gensler
Dave Elrod
Dave Elrod, who leads DPR's Tampa business unit, ceremonially signs the beam. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers
Ceremonial beam
More than 250 guests including design team members, subcontractors, craftspeople and owners enjoyed a barbecue lunch, presentation and ceremonial signing of the final beam to be raised into the structure. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers
Group photo
DPR thanked the subcontractors and construction crew for their hard work and dedication to maintaining a safe project site. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers

June 25, 2018

Duke University’s Dean Marion Broome Celebrates Progress of Duke Health's Interdisciplinary Building

In Durham, North Carolina, Marion Broome, PhD, RN, Dean of Duke University School of Nursing, paid a visit to personally thank the DPR crew on the progress of Duke Health's new five-story, 103,000-sq.-ft. interdisciplinary building.

Expected to be completed in fall 2019, the building is the future home of the Duke School of Medicine’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Division, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the School of Nursing. The shared space aims to promote collaborative scholarship and strengthens Duke’s academic community by teaching students the value of patient-centric care across multiple medical disciplines.

“On behalf of the Duke University School of Nursing faculty and staff, we are so excited about this opportunity to do, as Duke does, to collaborate so well but to also take interprofessional education to the next level,” said Broome.

Dean Broome visits jobsite
Dean Marion Broome visited the jobsite to celebrate progress of the interdisciplinary building. Photo courtesy of Andrew Buchanan
Dean Broome visits jobsite
Dean Broome personally thanked the project team for its work on the 103,000-sq.-ft. building. Photo courtesy of Andrew Buchanan
Dean Broome visits jobsite
The team gave Dean Broome a tour of the jobsite. Photo courtesy of Andrew Buchanan
Dean Broome visits jobsite
Expected to be completed in fall 2019, the building is the future home of the Duke School of Medicine’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Division, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the School of Nursing. Photo courtesy of Ayers Saint Gross

May 2, 2018

Construction Underway at Inova Loudoun Hospital’s Patient Tower

Construction is underway at Inova Loudoun Hospital’s (ILH) new patient tower in Leesburg, Virginia. Scheduled for completion in 2020, the tower is one phase of ILH’s $300 million master plan for expansion of facilities and services.

The 7-story 385,000-sq.-ft. patient tower was designed by HDR in collaboration with RSG Architects to create a patient-focused experience that elevates the human spirit. The tower will include:

  • Private, patient-centered rooms
  • New obstetrics unit and expanded Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)
  • Expanded Progressive Care Unit (PCU) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU)
  • Expanded Inova Heart and Vascular Institute Schaufeld Family Heart Center
  • More tertiary services, including Level III Trauma at the Inova Virts Miller Family Emergency and Trauma Center and throughout the hospital
  • Outpatient services, diagnostic imaging, a café and hospital support
  • Shell space for future expansion
Groundbreaking photo
The team broke ground on Inova Loudoun Hospital’s new patient tower in September 2017. Photo courtesy of Kimberly Shumaker
Aerial photo
Construction on the 7-story, 385,000-sq.ft. patient tower is underway. Photo courtesy of Louay Ghaziri
Rendering
Scheduled for completion in 2020, the patient tower is a part of Inova Loudoun Hospital’s $300 million master plan for expansion of facilities and services. Photo courtesy of HDR

March 28, 2018

VCU Health C.A.R.E. Building Opens to Provide Accessible Healthcare

VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital’s new C.A.R.E. Building opened in February 2018, creating a comprehensive medical center housing clinics, administration, rehabilitation and education services for the residents of southern Virginia and northern North Carolina.

Adjacent to the Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill, Virginia, the $14.4 million, 67,000-sq.-ft. C.A.R.E. Building represents VCU’s commitment to make comprehensive healthcare as accessible as possible for its patients. It is home to physician practices and hospital services including cardiology, pulmonology, family care and orthopedics. The new facility will also house a family dental clinic that is set to open later this year.

VCU Health C.A.R.E. building exterior.
Photo courtesy of Judy Davis
Photo courtesy of Judy Davis
Photo courtesy of Judy Davis
Photo courtesy of Judy Davis

December 22, 2016

DPR Experts Spark Conversation at Bisnow’s Annual Data Center Investment Expo

Two of DPR’s core market experts took the stage this winter at Bisnow’s Annual Data Center Investment Expo in Dallas, where industry leaders from across the country gathered to discuss the latest trends and innovations in data centers and industrial buildings.

Among the group of speakers and panelists were DPR’s Mark Thompson, national advanced technology market group leader and Andy Andres, a project executive in DPR’s Dallas office.

Throughout Thompson’s role as moderator of one of the panels, several topics about site selection were debated, including successful factors to hyperscale projects, and the process of locating strong regions and sites.

Thompson recalls the following takeaways:

  • The key to a hyperscale project’s success is speed-to-market and partnerships, due to rapid growth and extensive project scopes.
  • After the strategy behind the business direction is decided, regions are then considered and based around demand.
  • The two pivotal factors following site selection include core fundamentals of infrastructure (water, sewer, power, fiber), and connectivity to populated areas for access to labor.

Andres participated in a design and development discussion focused on the importance of progressive technology when building data centers. As a panelist, Andres shared some of DPR’s best practices in technology utilization, including:

  • The use of laser scanning and drones, which help transform facilities into more adaptable and flexible spaces, ultimately reducing uncertainty during the construction process.
  • The creation of a collaborative work environment with real-time project management tools to continuously reaffirm what the customer wants to build and how they want to build it.
  • The importance of technical platforms to integrate virtual designs in design-assist and build-out.

Industrial buildings and data centers have been equipped with more features in recent years and are continuing to evolve. Data centers are transforming to denser builds with more power and cooling. Like DPR, other client-serving companies are creating their own standards of certification, which can lead to an entirely different approach to build-outs and the overall business purpose of a project.

Overall, both conversations captured new and upcoming trends seen across the country in the business and development of data centers. From fundamental project planning to advancements in technology, both panels influenced audiences by providing a variety of outlooks and experiences, as well as robust strategy.

December 21, 2016

Q&A: Building Lasting Relationships

To truly develop a lasting relationship with a medical center, you have to be prepared to assist in whatever way is necessary to help them succeed, whether it is to provide a budget, complete a large expansion or come back to move something as simple as a door.

Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, California, a project DPR completed in 2012, recently selected DPR to build two new projects, valued at $200,000 each: retrofitting the existing labor-and-delivery floor and adding a neonatal intensive-care unit to the same floor. 


Palomar Medical Center accommodates up to 360 patient beds, 12 operating rooms, a 50-room trauma center, a 60,000-sq.-ft. undulating green roof and a 40,000-sq.-ft. central plant.

San Diego business unit leader Brian Gracz, who was the project executive on the original Palomar Medical Center, recently chatted with commercial real estate publication GlobeSt about what it takes not only to build great things, but build great relationships.

Read the full Q&A on the DPR Review

December 13, 2016

DPR Corner: The Advancement of Standards

We all desire more predictable results and outcomes.

One of DPR’s four core values is Ever Forward: “We believe in continual self-initiated change, improvement, learning and the advancement of standards for their own sake.” This core value, combined with our other core values of integrity, enjoyment and uniqueness, has served us well.

It has helped sustain our desire to be a progressive and nimble learning organization, where people are empowered to drive continuous improvement for our customers and their projects. DPR has always been a thinking organization, with people willing to learn, change, adapt, move and build it better.

But as we move forward and further dissect the intent of our Ever Forward core value, we must also be mindful of where standards (or the advancement of standards) fit into our entrepreneurial company culture and our customer-centric industry. Well-crafted standards and proven current best practices (how we like to think of them at DPR) are the basis for improvement and can help set a strong foundation for consistency and reliability. 

Read the full story about how we’re working together to set new standards and then advance them for advancement’s sake in the DPR Review.


Ever Forward: “We believe in continual self-initiated change, improvement, learning and the advancement of standards for their own sake.” 

November 29, 2016

Bringing Together BIM and Virtual Reality to Prevent Injuries

Safety is a value, not a priority. Priorities can change over time, but value systems remain constant. As a part of building our culture of safety, DPR is piloting technology from Human Condition Safety (HCS), a workplace wearables startup that is creating a suite of tools that helps craft workers and their managers prevent injuries before they happen.

Used on select DPR project sites in Sacramento and the Bay Area, the HCS technology incorporates wearable devices that disappear into traditional safety clothing, artificial intelligence, BIM and cloud computing to create an ecosystem that keeps workers safe.

A DPR team performs tasks with HCS wearable devices embedded in traditional safety clothing. Photo courtesy of Jonathan Savosnick

HCS software develops deep insights about safety and efficiency, and can identify safety issues in real-time, as well as predict future events. HCS focuses on activities and repetitive motion to pose the question, what can be prevented right now, and what can be prevented in the future?

Read more about how we’re using wearable devices to prevent injuries before they happen in the DPR Review

October 6, 2016

Fire Prevention Week: Fire Safety Begins at Home!

Fire safety is important every day of the year, at home and on our jobsites.

The longest running public health and safety observance on record, Fire Prevention Week began in 1922, and has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls since then, aiming to educate citizens with the information they need to prevent death, injury, property and economic loss caused by fires.   

145 years ago from October 8-9, 1871, what is now known as the Great Chicago Fire killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres, forever changing the way that firefighters, public officials and citizens thought about fire safety.


Smoke alarms need to be replaced every ten years. (Image courtesy National Fire Protection Association)

Fire safety begins at home. Being informed about the basics could make a difference in protecting you wherever you are – at home, school or work. Below are a few fire safety tips:

  • Check your smoke detector battery: Three out of five home fire deaths happen from fires in homes with no smoke alarms, or no functioning smoke alarms. Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half, but when they fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are disconnected or dead. Replace your smoke alarms every ten years.
  • Have an escape plan: Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., when most people are asleep. Have an escape plan that includes: two different ways out, someone assigned to help those that need help getting out, someone assigned to call 911 and a safe meeting place outside of the house.
  • Cook with care: Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home fire injuries, followed by heating equipment. Never leave cooking unattended, wear clothes with short, rolled-up or tight-fitting sleeves and turn pot/pan handles inward on the stove so they can’t be accidentally bumped.  
  • Heat with caution: Just over half of home heating fire deaths result from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding. Keep portable heaters and space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn; unplug them when not in use.
  • Use electricity safely:  Failures or malfunctions in wiring, cords, lighting and other electrical equipment caused an estimated 44,900 home fires in 2013, resulting in 410 deaths and $1.3 billion in direct property damage. Avoid using extension cords when possible, never run them under rugs or carpet and replace and frayed or cracked extension cords. Don’t tamper with your fuse box of use improper-size fuses.

Fires are fast-moving and ever-changing situations, so practice, be prepared and communicate with your loved ones. Safety is a value at DPR, and we want each and every employee to stay safe wherever they are – whether it’s at home or on the jobsite.

More detailed fire safety tips can be found at the National Fire Protection Association.

*All statistics courtesy National Fire Protection Association