Eve R. Forward
DPR's Roving Reporter

Eve R. Forward

Eve R. Forward is DPR Construction's roving reporter. Born in 1990 in Redwood City, Eve lives and breathes DPR...Literally.

Posts: 146
Location: Redwood City, California
Favorite core value: Ever Forward, naturally! I was named after this core value.
Hometown: I was born in Redwood City, but now I live all over the country.
Best part of the job: Asking the hard-hitting questions that need answers.
Posts In: Construction Technologies, Data Centers and Mission Critical, Healthcare, Higher Education, News, Safety, Sustainability, Videos


December 22, 2016

DPR Experts Spark Conversation at Bisnow’s Annual Data Center Investment Expo

Two of DPR’s core market experts took the stage this winter at Bisnow’s Annual Data Center Investment Expo in Dallas, where industry leaders from across the country gathered to discuss the latest trends and innovations in data centers and industrial buildings.

Among the group of speakers and panelists were DPR’s Mark Thompson, national advanced technology market group leader and Andy Andres, a project executive in DPR’s Dallas office.

Throughout Thompson’s role as moderator of one of the panels, several topics about site selection were debated, including successful factors to hyperscale projects, and the process of locating strong regions and sites.

Thompson recalls the following takeaways:

  • The key to a hyperscale project’s success is speed-to-market and partnerships, due to rapid growth and extensive project scopes.
  • After the strategy behind the business direction is decided, regions are then considered and based around demand.
  • The two pivotal factors following site selection include core fundamentals of infrastructure (water, sewer, power, fiber), and connectivity to populated areas for access to labor.

Andres participated in a design and development discussion focused on the importance of progressive technology when building data centers. As a panelist, Andres shared some of DPR’s best practices in technology utilization, including:

  • The use of laser scanning and drones, which help transform facilities into more adaptable and flexible spaces, ultimately reducing uncertainty during the construction process.
  • The creation of a collaborative work environment with real-time project management tools to continuously reaffirm what the customer wants to build and how they want to build it.
  • The importance of technical platforms to integrate virtual designs in design-assist and build-out.

Industrial buildings and data centers have been equipped with more features in recent years and are continuing to evolve. Data centers are transforming to denser builds with more power and cooling. Like DPR, other client-serving companies are creating their own standards of certification, which can lead to an entirely different approach to build-outs and the overall business purpose of a project.

Overall, both conversations captured new and upcoming trends seen across the country in the business and development of data centers. From fundamental project planning to advancements in technology, both panels influenced audiences by providing a variety of outlooks and experiences, as well as robust strategy.

December 21, 2016

Q&A: Building Lasting Relationships

To truly develop a lasting relationship with a medical center, you have to be prepared to assist in whatever way is necessary to help them succeed, whether it is to provide a budget, complete a large expansion or come back to move something as simple as a door.

Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, California, a project DPR completed in 2012, recently selected DPR to build two new projects, valued at $200,000 each: retrofitting the existing labor-and-delivery floor and adding a neonatal intensive-care unit to the same floor. 


Palomar Medical Center accommodates up to 360 patient beds, 12 operating rooms, a 50-room trauma center, a 60,000-sq.-ft. undulating green roof and a 40,000-sq.-ft. central plant.

San Diego business unit leader Brian Gracz, who was the project executive on the original Palomar Medical Center, recently chatted with commercial real estate publication GlobeSt about what it takes not only to build great things, but build great relationships.

Read the full Q&A on the DPR Review

December 13, 2016

DPR Corner: The Advancement of Standards

We all desire more predictable results and outcomes.

One of DPR’s four core values is Ever Forward: “We believe in continual self-initiated change, improvement, learning and the advancement of standards for their own sake.” This core value, combined with our other core values of integrity, enjoyment and uniqueness, has served us well.

It has helped sustain our desire to be a progressive and nimble learning organization, where people are empowered to drive continuous improvement for our customers and their projects. DPR has always been a thinking organization, with people willing to learn, change, adapt, move and build it better.

But as we move forward and further dissect the intent of our Ever Forward core value, we must also be mindful of where standards (or the advancement of standards) fit into our entrepreneurial company culture and our customer-centric industry. Well-crafted standards and proven current best practices (how we like to think of them at DPR) are the basis for improvement and can help set a strong foundation for consistency and reliability. 

Read the full story about how we’re working together to set new standards and then advance them for advancement’s sake in the DPR Review.


Ever Forward: “We believe in continual self-initiated change, improvement, learning and the advancement of standards for their own sake.” 

November 29, 2016

Bringing Together BIM and Virtual Reality to Prevent Injuries

Safety is a value, not a priority. Priorities can change over time, but value systems remain constant. As a part of building our culture of safety, DPR is piloting technology from Human Condition Safety (HCS), a workplace wearables startup that is creating a suite of tools that helps craft workers and their managers prevent injuries before they happen.

Used on select DPR project sites in Sacramento and the Bay Area, the HCS technology incorporates wearable devices that disappear into traditional safety clothing, artificial intelligence, BIM and cloud computing to create an ecosystem that keeps workers safe.

HCS Blog Image
A DPR team performs tasks with HCS wearable devices embedded in traditional safety clothing. Photo courtesy of Jonathan Savosnick

HCS software develops deep insights about safety and efficiency, and can identify safety issues in real-time, as well as predict future events. HCS focuses on activities and repetitive motion to pose the question, what can be prevented right now, and what can be prevented in the future?

Read more about how we’re using wearable devices to prevent injuries before they happen in the DPR Review

October 6, 2016

Fire Prevention Week: Fire Safety Begins at Home!

Fire safety is important every day of the year, at home and on our jobsites.

The longest running public health and safety observance on record, Fire Prevention Week began in 1922, and has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls since then, aiming to educate citizens with the information they need to prevent death, injury, property and economic loss caused by fires.   

145 years ago from October 8-9, 1871, what is now known as the Great Chicago Fire killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres, forever changing the way that firefighters, public officials and citizens thought about fire safety.


Smoke alarms need to be replaced every ten years. (Image courtesy National Fire Protection Association)

Fire safety begins at home. Being informed about the basics could make a difference in protecting you wherever you are – at home, school or work. Below are a few fire safety tips:

  • Check your smoke detector battery: Three out of five home fire deaths happen from fires in homes with no smoke alarms, or no functioning smoke alarms. Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half, but when they fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are disconnected or dead. Replace your smoke alarms every ten years.
  • Have an escape plan: Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., when most people are asleep. Have an escape plan that includes: two different ways out, someone assigned to help those that need help getting out, someone assigned to call 911 and a safe meeting place outside of the house.
  • Cook with care: Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home fire injuries, followed by heating equipment. Never leave cooking unattended, wear clothes with short, rolled-up or tight-fitting sleeves and turn pot/pan handles inward on the stove so they can’t be accidentally bumped.  
  • Heat with caution: Just over half of home heating fire deaths result from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding. Keep portable heaters and space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn; unplug them when not in use.
  • Use electricity safely:  Failures or malfunctions in wiring, cords, lighting and other electrical equipment caused an estimated 44,900 home fires in 2013, resulting in 410 deaths and $1.3 billion in direct property damage. Avoid using extension cords when possible, never run them under rugs or carpet and replace and frayed or cracked extension cords. Don’t tamper with your fuse box of use improper-size fuses.

Fires are fast-moving and ever-changing situations, so practice, be prepared and communicate with your loved ones. Safety is a value at DPR, and we want each and every employee to stay safe wherever they are – whether it’s at home or on the jobsite.

More detailed fire safety tips can be found at the National Fire Protection Association.

*All statistics courtesy National Fire Protection Association

July 5, 2016

Melissa King Named Rising Star by Training Magazine

At DPR, who we build is as important as what we build. Continuous learning and training have proven to be keys to the success of our individuals and project teams. So it’s no surprise that DPR’s Melissa King was chosen as a 2016 Emerging Training Leader and recognized in Training Magazine.

“From the moment Melissa walks in a room, she is able to build an awe-inspiring level of rapport with people,” said nominator Robert Jackson, part of Learning Practices at DPR.

Melissa and the 25 total rising stars chosen this year are excellent examples of how Learning and Development professionals can continuously inspire, innovate and excel. Nominated by co-workers or industry peers, the winners were chosen based on the following factors:

  • Have been in the training industry for at least two years, but no more than ten
  • Took on at least one new responsibility in the past year
  • Successfully led a large-scale training or learning and development initiative within the last year that required management of a group of people and achieved a corporate strategic goal
  • Demonstrates leadership qualities such as: acts as a mentor/coach, adopts new technology, collaborates, communicates effectively, embraces change, fosters employee recognition, has a global mindset, innovates, inspires trust, provides regular feedback, sets an ethical example, thinks strategically and outside the box
  • Has the potential to lead the Training or Learning & Development function at an organization in the next one to ten years

Currently, Melissa supports over 3,000 professional staff and field craft across all DPR offices. One of her more salient responsibilities is leading Current Best Practices (CBP), DPR’s intensive training session that all new hires participate in within their first year with the company. CBP also happens to be Melissa’s favorite part about her job. “Getting to know a group of new DPR employees each time and walking away knowing we continue to hire great people is a pretty cool feeling. I feel like I leave each session with 30 new friends!” said Melissa.

Congratulations!


A group at Current Best Practices participates in an interactive quality control exercise. 


Melissa King and a Current Best Practices group in Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina celebrate a successful training session. 

July 3, 2016

Happy Birthday, America (and DPR!)

Did you know? The Continental Congress actually voted to approve a resolution of independence declaring the United States independent from Great Britain on July 2, 1776. Congress debated and revised the wording of the Declaration of Independence, approving the final version on July 4, America’s celebrated birthday.

DPR Construction was also founded on July 2 (26 years ago in 1990) with the desire to be something different in the industry:  a company that exists to build great things—great teams, great projects, great relationships. A place that provides people with opportunities to learn and be better builders. An organization that cares deeply about changing the world and our surrounding communities.

More than two-and-a-half decades later, DPR has grown into a multi-billion-dollar organization that has built long-standing relationships with some of the world’s most progressive and admired companies.

Thank you for helping to turn a vision into a reality. We look forward to the next 26 years—working together to build a better future for generations to come.

Have a safe and happy 4th of July!


DPR co-founder Ron Davidowski leads a team on a site walk on a project in San Diego, California.


DPR celebrates its 26th birthday with a sunny BBQ in Redwood City, California. 


Yum! DPR employees enjoy a sundae and pie bar at the birthday BBQ.

June 27, 2016

DPR Survives the Big One! Six-Story Steel-Frame Building Withstands Earthquake Simulation

On the world’s largest outdoor shake table at the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego), DPR erected the tallest cold-formed, steel-frame structure ever to be tested on a shake table. As engineers, scientists, earthquake experts and media watched, the six-story building withstood a simulation of 150% of 1994’s 6.7-magnitude Northridge, California earthquake, shaking and rocking, but remaining structurally intact and safe.

“What we are doing is the equivalent of giving the building an EKG to see how it performs after an earthquake and a post-earthquake fire,” said principal investigator and UC San Diego structural engineering professor Tara Hutchinson.

The project is part of a $1.5 million three-week series of tests, analyzing how cold-formed steel structural systems perform in multi-story buildings located in high seismic hazard zones. Prior to this test, the largest building ever studied was a two-story residential structure in 2013. The structure experienced accelerations of 3.0 to 3.5 G’s at the upper levels, putting a tremendous amount of demand on the “light-gauge” structural frame. Lighter than a concrete, or hot-rolled structural steel building of the same height, the cold-form, light-gauge panelized structure is strong and flexible, thus able to move with the shaking instead of against it.

“The introduction of light-gauge structural systems in areas of high seismic hazard offers owners a superior option over traditional wood framing construction from economic, quality, safety, sustainability and overall building performance standpoints,” said DPR’s Zach Murphy, who is part of DPR’s cold-form steel prefab operations team. “We believe the results of these tests and future projects will continue to prove that this is the better way to build and create higher quality, safer structures in a cost-effective manner.”

In 2015, DPR constructed the MonteCedro senior-living community in Altadena, California, using prefabricated light-gauge panels. While the direct costs were close to wood-frame construction, additional savings were realized through faster schedule, better fire resistance and higher quality framing. DPR also recently built student housing at Otis College in Los Angeles using cold-formed structural framing.

Full video of this week’s shake test can be viewed below:

Shake Test Group Pic Edited
Scott Reasoner (DPR), Steve Helland (DPR), Tara Hutchinson (UCSD), James Atwood (DPR) and Kelly Holcomb (Sureboard) celebrate the performance of the prefabricated light-gauge structure in San Diego, California.

June 6, 2016

Touchdown! Clemson Coaches Offer a Sneak Peek of Football Operations Building

It's safe to say Clemson football is excited for its new Football Operations Building

A tiger may never change its stripes, but it can put on a DPR safety helmet. Head coach Dabo Swinney recently pulled off an epic trick play, disguising himself as "Fred," a laborer from Albuquerque, as part of Clemson's version of popular reality TV series “Undercover Boss.” 

Watch ESPN's video to see if his plan to get a sneak peek of the new facility while it's still under construction works. 

Coach Swinney wasn't the only surprise visitor on the site, as defensive coordinator Brent Venables also stopped by to "coach" the construction crew, bringing his trademark intensity along with him. Check out the video and see what happens.

But for now, back to the building.

This new facility, which Swinney calls "the epitome of Clemson" due to its fun and unique nature, will set the bar high for any future athletic facility in the college football arms race.  

The 142,500-sq.-ft. operations building will include coaches’ offices, team meeting rooms, recruiting areas, locker rooms, weight rooms, training rooms, a hydro-therapy area, equipment room, dining areas and associated support spaces.  All of which will allow Clemson’s Athletic Department to better serve the needs of its student-athletes.

Coach said it best when he said, “Clemson is going to be the envy of the entire country when this thing is finished.”

Go Tigers!

May 24, 2016

Bloomberg Takes Viewers Inside Facebook’s Sweden Data Center

Status updates, comments, likes, photos, videos... they all require data and need to be accessible within just a few clicks, 24 hours a day, by Facebook's 1.65 billion monthly active users around the world.

That calls for large quantities of data, strong processing power, and a lot of cooling. This is why the seaside town of Luleå, located on the edge of the Arctic Circle and considered Sweden's Silicon Valley, was a perfect location for Facebook to build one of its massive greenfield data center developments.

At 300,000 sq. ft., Facebook's Luleå Data Center is one of the largest and most efficient data centers ever built. The data center, like Facebook's other facilities built by DPR in Oregon, North Carolina and Texas, features a super-efficient design that uses 100 percent outside air to cool the data center. This eliminates the need for power-hungry chillers to cool the tens of thousands of servers that run around the clock. Excess heat that is generated from the servers is pumped back into the building to keep the office space warm for employees. Power is provided locally by a reliable, 100 percent renewable energy source: hydroelectricity. Hydroelectricity is so reliable that Facebook has been able to eliminate the number of onsite backup generators by 70 percent.

As part of Bloomberg's "Hello World" video series, in which journalist and best-selling author Ashlee Vance explores the tech scene in various countries, Ashlee finds out where "all [his] embarrassing photos live" while he takes a guided tour of the facility with Joel Kjellgren, Facebook's site manager. 

DPR completed building one of Facebook's Luleå development, aptly named "LLA1," in 17 months through a joint venture between NCC Construction Sweden and Fortis Construction in Portland, Oregon. LLA1 achieved LEED-NC Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council and received top honors with the "Innovation in the Mega Data Center" award at the Datacenter Dynamics EMEA Awards in 2014.