Across DPR Blog: Eve R. Forward

Eve R. Forward
DPR's Roving Reporter

Eve R.  Forward

Eve R. Forward is DPR Construction's roving reporter. Born in 1990 in Redwood City, Eve lives and breathes DPR...Literally.

Posts: 82
Location: Redwood City, California
Favorite core value: Ever Forward, naturally! I was named after this core value.
Hometown: I was born in Redwood City, but now I live all over the country.
Best part of the job: Asking the hard-hitting questions that need answers.
Posts In: Communities, Construction Technologies, Corporate Office, Data Centers and Mission Critical, Healthcare, Higher Education, Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Lean, Life Sciences, News, Sustainability, Technical Papers, Videos


January 20, 2015

A Bird’s Eye View: Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Data Collection

On more than 15 DPR projects nationwide, project teams are reaping the benefits of using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or "drones").

Teams are using this technology for data collection. UAVs fly across project jobsites and take up to thousands of pictures. The pictures are then stitched into a large mosaic image, which project teams can use as a map to communicate and collaborate.

Pictured above: The team building the Betty and Bob Beyster Institute for Nursing Research, Advanced Practice and Simulation at the University of San Diego uses their images and video to communicate project updates.

Learn more here: Experience a "Day in the Life" of DPR project teams that use UAVs.

Want to learn even more about UAVs in general? Here's a recent Wall Street Journal article (subscription required) about the phenomenon.

January 13, 2015

Technology Pushing Greater Service (at Lower Cost) for Life of Building

In an in-depth Q&A with DPR's Atul Khanzode, he shares the insight gained through his decade of virtual design and construction (VDC) and lean experience on complex projects. Khanzode leads DPR’s strategic VDC technology initiatives.

"It’s not so much about the specific technologies we’re using, but more about how we are applying those technologies to enhance the delivery process for our customers," he says. 

Khanzode also touches on major challenges facing the industry, what's popular in construction technology and how it's changing the construction industry. 

"The use of tested technologies is playing a key role in adding reliability to the process, allowing us to better predict project outcomes for our customers," he says.


Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or “drones”) are helpful in data collection so teams can track construction progress (just one example of a construction technology trend)

January 6, 2015

How Team’s Technical Expertise Helped Gulfstream Project Soar

With BIM and lean techniques being especially helpful for equipment and schedule coordination, DPR Hardin built a 430,000-sq.-ft. manufacturing space for Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation. 

Gulfstream develops and manufactures the world’s most technologically advanced business-jet aircraft. However, it wasn't DPR Hardin’s deep aerospace experience that ultimately won the job; it was solid technical expertise, which offers clear parallels to aerospace manufacturing.

How did collaboration with the owner, a unique foundation and a complex web of infrastructure systems factor into the equation? 

Read the full story here to learn more (including why it was described as "one of coolest, most challenging and satisfying jobs most of the team has ever built").


Photo by David Robinson Photography

January 2, 2015

Which 3 Healthcare Trend Predictions Are Ringing True Today?

Published 2 years ago, DPR's "Future of Healthcare" study identified the most significant, long-term trends in healthcare and its impact on facilities. The study was a yearlong effort to interview and survey more than 40 executives and leaders in healthcare and the architecture/engineering/construction (AEC) industries.

Some of the findings included:

  • Prediction #1: Renovation and adaptive reuse will increase;
  • Prediction #2: Outpatient services will continue to be the focal point for growth; and
  • Prediction #3: Technology/data intensity will be crucial. 

DPR is now seeing these trends manifested in the healthcare projects it’s working on, particularly those that are coming to its Special Services Group (SSG)

SSG is DPR’s team of builders who focus on quicker and smaller-scale projects. Of DPR's 7,500 completed smaller-scale projects (valued in the $5 million or less range), about 20% were in the healthcare sector. 

Read more about healthcare trends here in the latest issue of the DPR Review newsletter. 

An example of adaptive reuse, Texas Children’s Outpatient Therapy and Specialty Care Clinics were constructed in 17,500 sq. ft. of an existing suburban strip mall in Houston. (Photo by Jud Haggard Photography)

December 18, 2014

Happy Holidays from DPR Construction!

'Twas weeks before the new year and a video we did make (click the image below to check it out)...


From all of us at DPR, we wish you a happy holiday season!

December 17, 2014

ENR Picks Net-Zero Energy Office as Project of the Year

“A beautifully done project that pushed existing technology.”

That’s how one of the Engineering News-Record (ENR) judges described ENR’s Northern California Project of the Year and Best Green Project: DPR’s net-zero energy designed office in San Francisco.


The team with the award at the ceremony. (Photo courtesy of Andrea Walker)

There were 140 total entries for ENR California’s Best Project Award. Judges evaluated projects on five distinct criteria:

  1. Overcoming challenges and teamwork
  2. Safety
  3. Innovation & contribution to the industry/community
  4. Construction quality & craftsmanship
  5. Function & aesthetic quality of design

Along with DPR as the builder, the design and consulting team included FME Architecture + Design, Integral Group, Paradigm Structural Engineers, Inc., Decker Electric, Anderson, Row & Buckley, Inc. and 58 other essential partners.

In five months, the team researched, designed, permitted and built the highly-efficient, 24,000-sq.-ft. modern workplace with a number of sustainability features, including the LEED Dynamic Plaque. DPR’s office and the U.S. Green Building Council’s headquarters in Washington, DC, are the first two to use the LEED Dynamic Plaque, which is a building performance monitoring and scoring platform.

Watch the videos below, which explain DPR's net-zero energy designed office and its LEED Dynamic Plaque.

 

December 2, 2014

What Gets Measured Gets Done

Measurement is key to getting things done. This is especially true when it comes to creating smarter, better functioning buildings to bridge the gap between predicted and actual building systems’ performance.

To achieve net-zero certification, for example, organizations such as the International Living Future Institute look at a building’s annual performance to ensure that it produces all of its energy (examples include DPR's Phoenix Regional Office and the Packard Foundation Headquarters). 

However, at DPR, we believe that there needs to be an energy measurement for all buildings beyond LEED, not just net-zero buildings. This will help building owners and users compare results to improve building performance. 

Learn about what DPR’s Management Committee recommended for the industry to benchmark energy usage. 

(Hint: It's a metric called energy use intensity.)

November 18, 2014

Showcase Highlights Trending Construction Technology

DPR's Phoenix office recently held a Construction Technology Showcase to highlight the latest technology trends in construction. The showcase was held in conjunction with the Phoenix office open house, and was modeled after similar events in other regions.

DPR's technology enthusiasts staffed booths with live demos and models, explaining the technology and possible applications, as well as how we can use it to add value to our customers. 

Featured technology included:

  • real time laser scanning,
  • virtual reality using Oculus Rift headsets,
  • 3D printing, and
  • BIM 360 Glue.

Technology isn't just a magic bullet. It's not the technology alone, rather it's the skilled application of that technology and technical expertise of the builder using it that provides predictable results.

From L to R: DPR Engineers Jiun Chiang, Jose Diosdado Garcia, Andres Sanchez Hernandez, Chidambaram Somu, Andy Marks, Casey Helburg, and Brent Elliott.

Photos Courtesy of Chidambaram Somu

What's the most interesting construction technology you've seen or used lately?

November 4, 2014

Cutting Down Schedule from Months to Weeks

Want to learn how DPR is maximizing efficiency while improving safety and accuracy?

One way is through a pilot program that the Self-Perform Work (SPW) group recently completed. Outlined in an article–"Opportunity Knocks"–in the latest DPR Review newsletter, the SPW group's method of prefabricating and assembling doors offsite is saving time and resources. 


Photo by Everett Rosette

While normally assembled at the jobsite, moving door production to a warehouse provides a more controlled environment. The crew then takes the fully assembled doors to the jobsite for installation. This has proven to be helpful in projects both large and small. 

On one project, the group's use of this method reduced the installation schedule from 8 months to 8 weeks!

Due to its success, this door assembling pilot program has now morphed into a new best practice.

October 15, 2014

Mentors Participate in ACE All Schools Day

On October 11th, Southern California DPR employees participated in the ACE Mentor Program's All Schools Day, a competition for all Los Angeles and Orange County schools that participate in ACE. DPR employees across the country volunteer their time for the program, which brings together architecture, engineering and construction professionals with high school students in a formal extracurricular enrichment program. 

The DPR mentors, who work with Century High School students in Santa Ana, were Brennan Cooke, Brandon Fullam and Ocean Van. Ron Rendina also participated with the Pasadena team. Josh DeStefano and Alison Lind also mentor at Century High, but could not attend this event.

The challenge was to build a cantilevered platform from popsicle sticks, pasta and hot glue within a two-hour time frame. Mentors could help with design, but not build. Each school was judged on load the platform could carry, efficiency and overall performance. 

L to R: Brandon Fullam, Ron Rendina, Brennan Cooke, and Ocean Van.