Eve R. Forward
DPR's Roving Reporter

Eve R.  Forward

Eve R. Forward is DPR Construction's roving reporter. Born in 1990 in Redwood City, Eve lives and breathes DPR...Literally.

Posts: 138
Location: Redwood City, California
Favorite core value: Ever Forward, naturally! I was named after this core value.
Hometown: I was born in Redwood City, but now I live all over the country.
Best part of the job: Asking the hard-hitting questions that need answers.
Posts In: Communities, Construction Technologies, Corporate Office, Data Center, Data Centers and Mission Critical, Healthcare, Higher Education, Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Lean, Life Sciences, News, Safety, Sustainability, Technical Papers, Videos

October 7, 2016

Fire Prevention Week: Fire Safety Begins at Home!

Fire safety is important every day of the year, at home and on our jobsites.

The longest running public health and safety observance on record, Fire Prevention Week began in 1922, and has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls since then, aiming to educate citizens with the information they need to prevent death, injury, property and economic loss caused by fires.   

145 years ago from October 8-9, 1871, what is now known as the Great Chicago Fire killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres, forever changing the way that firefighters, public officials and citizens thought about fire safety.

Smoke alarms need to be replaced every ten years. (Image courtesy National Fire Protection Association)

Fire safety begins at home. Being informed about the basics could make a difference in protecting you wherever you are – at home, school or work. Below are a few fire safety tips:

  • Check your smoke detector battery: Three out of five home fire deaths happen from fires in homes with no smoke alarms, or no functioning smoke alarms. Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half, but when they fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are disconnected or dead. Replace your smoke alarms every ten years.
  • Have an escape plan: Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., when most people are asleep. Have an escape plan that includes: two different ways out, someone assigned to help those that need help getting out, someone assigned to call 911 and a safe meeting place outside of the house.
  • Cook with care: Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home fire injuries, followed by heating equipment. Never leave cooking unattended, wear clothes with short, rolled-up or tight-fitting sleeves and turn pot/pan handles inward on the stove so they can’t be accidentally bumped.  
  • Heat with caution: Just over half of home heating fire deaths result from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding. Keep portable heaters and space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn; unplug them when not in use.
  • Use electricity safely:  Failures or malfunctions in wiring, cords, lighting and other electrical equipment caused an estimated 44,900 home fires in 2013, resulting in 410 deaths and $1.3 billion in direct property damage. Avoid using extension cords when possible, never run them under rugs or carpet and replace and frayed or cracked extension cords. Don’t tamper with your fuse box of use improper-size fuses.

Fires are fast-moving and ever-changing situations, so practice, be prepared and communicate with your loved ones. Safety is a value at DPR, and we want each and every employee to stay safe wherever they are – whether it’s at home or on the jobsite.

More detailed fire safety tips can be found at the National Fire Protection Association.

*All statistics courtesy National Fire Protection Association

July 6, 2016

Melissa King Named Rising Star by Training Magazine

At DPR, who we build is as important as what we build. Continuous learning and training have proven to be keys to the success of our individuals and project teams. So it’s no surprise that DPR’s Melissa King was chosen as a 2016 Emerging Training Leader and recognized in Training Magazine.

“From the moment Melissa walks in a room, she is able to build an awe-inspiring level of rapport with people,” said nominator Robert Jackson, part of Learning Practices at DPR.

Melissa and the 25 total rising stars chosen this year are excellent examples of how Learning and Development professionals can continuously inspire, innovate and excel. Nominated by co-workers or industry peers, the winners were chosen based on the following factors:

  • Have been in the training industry for at least two years, but no more than ten
  • Took on at least one new responsibility in the past year
  • Successfully led a large-scale training or learning and development initiative within the last year that required management of a group of people and achieved a corporate strategic goal
  • Demonstrates leadership qualities such as: acts as a mentor/coach, adopts new technology, collaborates, communicates effectively, embraces change, fosters employee recognition, has a global mindset, innovates, inspires trust, provides regular feedback, sets an ethical example, thinks strategically and outside the box
  • Has the potential to lead the Training or Learning & Development function at an organization in the next one to ten years

Currently, Melissa supports over 3,000 professional staff and field craft across all DPR offices. One of her more salient responsibilities is leading Current Best Practices (CBP), DPR’s intensive training session that all new hires participate in within their first year with the company. CBP also happens to be Melissa’s favorite part about her job. “Getting to know a group of new DPR employees each time and walking away knowing we continue to hire great people is a pretty cool feeling. I feel like I leave each session with 30 new friends!” said Melissa.


A group at Current Best Practices participates in an interactive quality control exercise. 

Melissa King and a Current Best Practices group in Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina celebrate a successful training session. 

July 4, 2016

Happy Birthday, America (and DPR!)

Did you know? The Continental Congress actually voted to approve a resolution of independence declaring the United States independent from Great Britain on July 2, 1776. Congress debated and revised the wording of the Declaration of Independence, approving the final version on July 4, America’s celebrated birthday.

DPR Construction was also founded on July 2 (26 years ago in 1990) with the desire to be something different in the industry:  a company that exists to build great things—great teams, great projects, great relationships. A place that provides people with opportunities to learn and be better builders. An organization that cares deeply about changing the world and our surrounding communities.

More than two-and-a-half decades later, DPR has grown into a multi-billion-dollar organization that has built long-standing relationships with some of the world’s most progressive and admired companies.

Thank you for helping to turn a vision into a reality. We look forward to the next 26 years—working together to build a better future for generations to come.

Have a safe and happy 4th of July!

DPR co-founder Ron Davidowski leads a team on a site walk on a project in San Diego, California.

DPR celebrates its 26th birthday with a sunny BBQ in Redwood City, California. 

Yum! DPR employees enjoy a sundae and pie bar at the birthday BBQ.

June 28, 2016

DPR Survives the Big One! Six-Story Steel-Frame Building Withstands Earthquake Simulation

On the world’s largest outdoor shake table at the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego), DPR erected the tallest cold-formed, steel-frame structure ever to be tested on a shake table. As engineers, scientists, earthquake experts and media watched, the six-story building withstood a simulation of 150% of 1994’s 6.7-magnitude Northridge, California earthquake, shaking and rocking, but remaining structurally intact and safe.

“What we are doing is the equivalent of giving the building an EKG to see how it performs after an earthquake and a post-earthquake fire,” said principal investigator and UC San Diego structural engineering professor Tara Hutchinson.

The project is part of a $1.5 million three-week series of tests, analyzing how cold-formed steel structural systems perform in multi-story buildings located in high seismic hazard zones. Prior to this test, the largest building ever studied was a two-story residential structure in 2013. The structure experienced accelerations of 3.0 to 3.5 G’s at the upper levels, putting a tremendous amount of demand on the “light-gauge” structural frame. Lighter than a concrete, or hot-rolled structural steel building of the same height, the cold-form, light-gauge panelized structure is strong and flexible, thus able to move with the shaking instead of against it.

“The introduction of light-gauge structural systems in areas of high seismic hazard offers owners a superior option over traditional wood framing construction from economic, quality, safety, sustainability and overall building performance standpoints,” said DPR’s Zach Murphy, who is part of DPR’s cold-form steel prefab operations team. “We believe the results of these tests and future projects will continue to prove that this is the better way to build and create higher quality, safer structures in a cost-effective manner.”

In 2015, DPR constructed the MonteCedro senior-living community in Altadena, California, using prefabricated light-gauge panels. While the direct costs were close to wood-frame construction, additional savings were realized through faster schedule, better fire resistance and higher quality framing. DPR also recently built student housing at Otis College in Los Angeles using cold-formed structural framing. 

Full video of this week’s shake test can be viewed below: 


Scott Reasoner (DPR), Steve Helland (DPR), Tara Hutchinson (UCSD), James Atwood (DPR) and Kelly Holcomb (Sureboard) celebrate the performance of the prefabricated light-gauge structure in San Diego, California. 

June 6, 2016

Touchdown! Clemson Coaches Offer a Sneak Peek of Football Operations Building

It's safe to say Clemson football is excited for its new Football Operations Building

A tiger may never change its stripes, but it can put on a DPR safety helmet. Head coach Dabo Swinney recently pulled off an epic trick play, disguising himself as "Fred," a laborer from Albuquerque, as part of Clemson's version of popular reality TV series “Undercover Boss.” 

Watch ESPN's video to see if his plan to get a sneak peek of the new facility while it's still under construction works. 

Coach Swinney wasn't the only surprise visitor on the site, as defensive coordinator Brent Venables also stopped by to "coach" the construction crew, bringing his trademark intensity along with him. Check out the video and see what happens.

But for now, back to the building.

This new facility, which Swinney calls "the epitome of Clemson" due to its fun and unique nature, will set the bar high for any future athletic facility in the college football arms race.  

The 142,500-sq.-ft. operations building will include coaches’ offices, team meeting rooms, recruiting areas, locker rooms, weight rooms, training rooms, a hydro-therapy area, equipment room, dining areas and associated support spaces.  All of which will allow Clemson’s Athletic Department to better serve the needs of its student-athletes.

Coach said it best when he said, “Clemson is going to be the envy of the entire country when this thing is finished.”

Go Tigers!

May 25, 2016

Bloomberg Takes Viewers Inside Facebook’s Sweden Data Center

Status updates, comments, likes, photos, videos... they all require data and need to be accessible within just a few clicks, 24 hours a day, by Facebook's 1.65 billion monthly active users around the world.

That calls for large quantities of data, strong processing power, and a lot of cooling. This is why the seaside town of Luleå, located on the edge of the Arctic Circle and considered Sweden's Silicon Valley, was a perfect location for Facebook to build one of its massive greenfield data center developments.

At 300,000 sq. ft., Facebook's Luleå Data Center is one of the largest and most efficient data centers ever built. The data center, like Facebook's other facilities built by DPR in Oregon, North Carolina and Texas, features a super-efficient design that uses 100 percent outside air to cool the data center. This eliminates the need for power-hungry chillers to cool the tens of thousands of servers that run around the clock. Excess heat that is generated from the servers is pumped back into the building to keep the office space warm for employees. Power is provided locally by a reliable, 100 percent renewable energy source: hydroelectricity. Hydroelectricity is so reliable that Facebook has been able to eliminate the number of onsite backup generators by 70 percent.

As part of Bloomberg's "Hello World" video series, in which journalist and best-selling author Ashlee Vance explores the tech scene in various countries, Ashlee finds out where "all [his] embarrassing photos live" while he takes a guided tour of the facility with Joel Kjellgren, Facebook's site manager. 

DPR completed building one of Facebook's Luleå development, aptly named "LLA1," in 17 months through a joint venture between NCC Construction Sweden and Fortis Construction in Portland, Oregon. LLA1 achieved LEED-NC Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council and received top honors with the "Innovation in the Mega Data Center" award at the Datacenter Dynamics EMEA Awards in 2014.

May 6, 2016

Celebrating Amazing Women

The modern holiday of Mother’s Day was first celebrated in 1908 in West Virginia, according to Wikipedia. A woman named Anna Jarvis held a memorial service for her mother who had been a peace activist and cared for wounded soldiers during the American Civil War. Anna wanted to honor her mother and set aside a day to honor all mothers, because she believed they were the “person who has done more for you than anyone in the world.”

DPR is proud of its many talented and empowered female employees and all that they accomplish each and every day. With Mother’s Day approaching, we are especially thankful for all working moms, whose tireless energy and endless ambition is an inspiration to all.

Most recently, DPR’s Deborah Beetson, a mother of two daughters, was recognized by The Commonweath Institute South Florida as part of a list of top ranking, for-profit, women-led organizations in Florida. With over 30 years of experience under her belt, Deborah’s leadership not only continues to raise the bar in the construction industry, but also sets a lasting example for aspiring female leaders and working moms.

“Long before the term ‘lean-in’ had significance, I grasped its importance,” said Beetson. "There were so many opportunities to take on large projects and roles, stuff that scared me but I knew I had to just jump in. All of these things were happening as I was raising two daughters and building upon my marriage. Sometimes I didn’t know how I was going to make it all work, but I just focused on the issues at hand and everything always had a way of falling into place.”

For any female, working mom or not, navigating through the construction industry can be a tough but rewarding experience.

“When I entered the construction world there were not many women to hold up as models or mentors, but I did encounter a few who exemplified behavior that I did not want to adopt, simply because they were trying to behave like their male counterparts and it just didn’t fit my style. So I learned that it was more important to just be myself, listen and learn. That way, anyone I worked with would recognize the value I could bring to their project,” said Beetson.

Today, the industry is still a male-dominated field. The percent of women in the construction industry is currently only nine percent (2014 US Bureau of Labor Statistics). However, thanks to trailblazing women like Deborah we hope that number will quickly change.

“It is clear that women are well suited for this industry,” said Beetson. “Women have an incredible knack for detailed work so digging into design details, estimating, handling cost management come easily.  Women are also natural consensus builders and bring a positive dynamic to teams which is so essential to foster collaboration and see the other side of the issue through the other person’s view.”

A recent West Palm Beach project, The Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health & Wellness Institute, exemplifies the industry’s progress in terms of female leadership. The facility was designed and constructed by a 90 percent female team, who shared the ultimate goal of leaving a lasting impact on women’s healthcare in the community.

Projects like these pave the way for the next generation of women in the industry, women with goals of becoming leaders and influencers within their workplace. 

Deborah Beetson stands with other awards recipients at The Commonwealth Institute's awards ceremony

Mothers at DPR's Redwood City office were treated to a special Mother's Day omelet bar earlier this morning

April 27, 2016

Best of the Best: UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay Honored by ENR

ENR’s Best of the Best Projects identified the best of design and construction achievement across the country among projects completed between June 2014 and June 2015. Regional winners were chosen in 20 categories and from there, the top winners in each category were moved up to the national competition. Judges examined each project in terms of teamwork, safety, innovation, quality and overcoming challenges in order to truly distinguish the best from the best.

At the 8th annual Best of the Best Awards ceremony, DPR proudly accepted the Best of the Best Healthcare award for the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay. In 2015, the medical facility was also named ENR California’s Best Healthcare Project in Northern California.This project was the result of a high-performing team dedicated to adapting to change without making sacrifices to cost, quality, or schedule – truly exemplifying all the key aspects that ENR was seeking in a Best of the Best Project. 

To complete the eight-year long project, the team used an integrated project delivery (IPD) method to keep the schedule and budget on track. Since the project’s beginning, more than 250 architects, engineers and contractors co-located in the Integrated Center for Design and Construction (ICDC) on the site to build a team focused on efficiency, collaboration, and quick decision making. The $1.5 billion medical center, delivered eight days early despite $55 million in changes, passed the California Department of Public Health’s licensing inspections with “no deficiencies,” which is unprecedented among new California hospitals.

The UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay project is a true example of a team committed to overcoming challenges while maintaining the highest levels of safety, innovation, and quality – and ENR agrees! 

Read more about the award winning project here

April 25, 2016

Roche Molecular Systems New Administrative Building is First of its Kind for the City of Pleasanton

On April 12, Roche Diagnostics celebrated the construction of its new administrative building with a traditional groundbreaking on its Pleasanton, California campus. The groundbreaking was attended by members of the project team, and key Roche executives, including the president. 

The project was awarded to DPR without competition due to our long-standing relationship with Roche and its Pleasanton campus for over 15 years. The first project was the construction of the original facility, followed by its R&D building and several tenant improvements.

Roche is working with the City of Pleasanton to be the first local building to use reclaimed water for toilets and industrial cooling. The new facility aims to have solar thermal panels for heating, and to be K6 compliant – a Roche directive to not use HFC or HCFC refrigerants. The new 70,000-sq.-ft. building is targeting LEED Gold certification with an estimated completion of January 2017.

March 1, 2016

Making Safety Personal

When it comes to safety, good or even great is never enough. DPR projects across the country continually look for safety ideas that encourage teams to change behaviors and achieve DPR’s zero incidents goal.

At the Arizona State University (ASU) Arizona Center for Law and Society (ACLS) in Phoenix, the team is going above and beyond to optimize jobsite safety by implementing creative new practices. For example:

  • Plus/delta sessions: Lunch-time brainstorming sessions where safety ideas are discussed, such as making filtered water more readily available to workers for hydration in the hot Arizona weather to procuring a specific knuckle boom lift that helped the plumbers do their job more safely.
  • Safety recognition stickers: On regular safety job walks, the ACLS leadership hands out stickers to those who demonstrate exemplary safety practices in the field. 
  • Acting on leading indicators: Before performing work, the crews fill out a pre-task plan that outlines how they will execute their assigned task in the safest manner possible. At the end of each week, these plans are reviewed and the three that demonstrate the most thorough safety action plans are awarded with free lunches. Those winning pre-task plans are then shared with the rest of the project team as an opportunity for learning. 

Safety results on the project speak volumes for the success of the team, as they make safety a value on site. In October, the team held a safety milestone barbeque for 270 people, celebrating 300,000 hours worked with a zero lost-time incident rate.

Read more about safety on the ACLS site here