Across DPR Blog: Eve R. Forward

Eve R. Forward
DPR's Roving Reporter

Eve R.  Forward

Eve R. Forward is DPR Construction's roving reporter. Born in 1990 in Redwood City, Eve lives and breathes DPR...Literally.

Posts: 75
Location: Redwood City, California
Favorite core value: Ever Forward, naturally! I was named after this core value.
Hometown: I was born in Redwood City, but now I live all over the country.
Best part of the job: Asking the hard-hitting questions that need answers.
Posts In: Communities, Construction Technologies, Corporate Office, Data Centers and Mission Critical, Healthcare, Higher Education, Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Lean, Life Sciences, News, Sustainability, Technical Papers, Videos


November 18, 2014

Showcase Highlights Trending Construction Technology

DPR's Phoenix office recently held a Construction Technology Showcase to highlight the latest technology trends in construction. The showcase was held in conjunction with the Phoenix office open house, and was modeled after similar events in other regions.

DPR's technology enthusiasts staffed booths with live demos and models, explaining the technology and possible applications, as well as how we can use it to add value to our customers. 

Featured technology included:

  • real time laser scanning,
  • virtual reality using Oculus Rift headsets,
  • 3D printing, and
  • BIM 360 Glue.

Technology isn't just a magic bullet. It's not the technology alone, rather it's the skilled application of that technology and technical expertise of the builder using it that provides predictable results.

From L to R: DPR Engineers Jiun Chiang, Jose Diosdado Garcia, Andres Sanchez Hernandez, Chidambaram Somu, Andy Marks, Casey Helburg, and Brent Elliott.

Photos Courtesy of Chidambaram Somu

What's the most interesting construction technology you've seen or used lately?

November 4, 2014

Cutting Down Schedule from Months to Weeks

Want to learn how DPR is maximizing efficiency while improving safety and accuracy?

One way is through a pilot program that the Self-Perform Work (SPW) group recently completed. Outlined in an article–"Opportunity Knocks"–in the latest DPR Review newsletter, the SPW group's method of prefabricating and assembling doors offsite is saving time and resources. 


Photo by Everett Rosette

While normally assembled at the jobsite, moving door production to a warehouse provides a more controlled environment. The crew then takes the fully assembled doors to the jobsite for installation. This has proven to be helpful in projects both large and small. 

On one project, the group's use of this method reduced the installation schedule from 8 months to 8 weeks!

Due to its success, this door assembling pilot program has now morphed into a new best practice.

October 15, 2014

Mentors Participate in ACE All Schools Day

On October 11th, Southern California DPR employees participated in the ACE Mentor Program's All Schools Day, a competition for all Los Angeles and Orange County schools that participate in ACE. DPR employees across the country volunteer their time for the program, which brings together architecture, engineering and construction professionals with high school students in a formal extracurricular enrichment program. 

The DPR mentors, who work with Century High School students in Santa Ana, were Brennan Cooke, Brandon Fullam and Ocean Van. Ron Rendina also participated with the Pasadena team. Josh DeStefano and Alison Lind also mentor at Century High, but could not attend this event.

The challenge was to build a cantilevered platform from popsicle sticks, pasta and hot glue within a two-hour time frame. Mentors could help with design, but not build. Each school was judged on load the platform could carry, efficiency and overall performance. 

L to R: Brandon Fullam, Ron Rendina, Brennan Cooke, and Ocean Van.

October 6, 2014

Whitepaper Watch: Getting the Most Out of BIM

When VDC apps are used correctly, project teams have the opportunity to improve productivity, reduce rework in the field, enhance building documentation, and feed into management systems that can result in lower long-term facility operating costs.

In light of these potential benefits, it can be tempting to think of software as a “silver bullet” to the solution to the many complex hurdles that project teams face. But even the very best software is simply a tool and is only useful if the person (or team) who wields it, does so effectively.

In a new DPR white paper, “Getting the Most Out of BIM: The Secret Guide to VDC Apps,” DPR’s Andrew Fisher addresses those issues and more. The educational guide for owners and users describes what major apps can do and which ones currently lead the market in six functional areas: BIM authoring, coordination, visualization, analysis and measurement, sequencing and estimating. 

For coordination, Autodesk Navisworks Manage stands out for its clash detection capabilities, while Autodesk BIM 360 Glue is also gaining popularity. Tapping into the power of the “cloud” to access the model, BIM 360 Glue works with iPads in the field.

For other BIM functions, some of the top applications include Lumion 3D for visualization, Solibri Model Checker for analysis and measurement, Synchro for sequencing, and Vico for estimating, to name just a few.

Understanding how to select and fully utilize the best BIM tools to their potential can create the most direct benefits to a project team’s processes, productivity and overall performance on a job.

The whitepaper was highlighted in the latest edition of the DPR Review, and can be viewed in full here.

September 29, 2014

Digital Project Resonates with Technology-Driven Owner

Digital projects are a growing trend around the country, and recently DPR completed its first in Florida. The 80,000-sq.-ft. headquarters for Carley Corporation, a training and technology solutions company, is owned by SWAMP 1. The project was completely digitally managed, saving the owner time and money despite the challenging, swampy Florida terrain.

The team primarily collaborated through the cloud, which also facilitated digital turnover and archiving, and used BIM 360 Glue on iPads in the field, laser scanning, and digital lean tools such as Last Planner. 

“When DPR said they were going to run this whole job electronically, I thought, a lot of companies say that; they don’t really do it,” Carley’s Chief Information Officer Jeremy Good said. “But in this case, it was true.”

See the full story on the SWAMP 1 project in the latest edition of the DPR Review.

September 22, 2014

Insights on Total Cost of Ownership

How can BIM help reduce operations and maintenance costs? What data yields the biggest results? Why isn't it being captured? What is "total cost of ownership" (TCO) anyway? 

DPR's Director of Consulting Andrew Arnold answers all these questions in a Q&A for the latest edition of the DPR Review. In the article, Andrew explains that the cost of designing and constructing a building is only 10 percent of the cost over the lifecycle of the building. The operation cost, which includes regular service and preventive maintenance for building systems, ongoing repairs, consumables and energy consumption, is 90 percent. This is why owners are realizing the importance of designing for TCO–often, investing a little more up front in a better building will mean savings over the long term.

Andrew highlights the value that building information modeling (BIM) can provide to operations and maintenance teams. When the right BIM data flows easily to operations teams, they can manage a building more efficiently and effectively. 

Read Andrew's entire Q&A here.

September 12, 2014

eBay’s Salt Lake City Data Center: Turning the Dial on Digital Efficiency

eBay Inc. has recently rolled out the world's first mission critical data center using fuel-cell technology as its primary power source, resulting in more available and reliable power with lower environmental impact. The Salt Lake City data center, designed by Winter Street Architects and built by DPR Construction, is highlighted in the latest edition of the DPR Review.

eBay Inc.’s decision to change gears from a more traditional design to the cleaner, greener power solution advanced its vision for a more environmentally sustainable future, according to Dean Nelson, eBay’s vice president of Global Foundation Services.

“By challenging the status quo on how data centers have been designed for the last 30 years, we’ve yielded even bigger returns,” Nelson explained. “In implementing a design like this, we’ve been able to ‘move the needle’ as we measure the increased efficiency of each transaction for our business.”

Read the full story here.

September 2, 2014

Is Guaranteed Building Performance Possible?

Guaranteed building performance has the potential to create more efficient buildings for the benefit of the owner’s bottom line, building occupants and the environment.

That’s the assessment of Steve Selkowitz, who explains the idea in a recent article for the DPR Review. Selkowitz has led Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Building Technology and Urban Systems Department for 20-plus years and has been recognized for his commitment to advancing building performance including winning the 2014 Award of Excellence from Engineering News-Record.

Tighter codes and regulations, rising costs, an increased demand for more employee-friendly workplaces, and commitment to sustainability are bringing discussions around guaranteed performance to the forefront. But the gap between predicted and measured building systems’ performance presents a major challenge.

 “Most people initially like the concept of guaranteed building performance,” Selkowitz said, “but they say, ‘Wait, how can I guarantee what an owner or occupant will do downstream?’ The key is to first define the energy use target, and then execute a design, construct and operate plan that keeps those targets in mind as a myriad of later decisions are made.”

Read the full article, “Is Guaranteed Building Performance Possible?”, in the latest issue of the DPR Review.

August 28, 2014

Barry Bonds Takes ALS Challenge at UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay Site

A bucket, a bit of ice water and a challenge to friends are all that it took for a social awareness campaign to rapidly get the world’s attention and support, including that of former San Francisco Giants baseball star Barry Bonds.

Bonds accepted the challenge at the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay site in San Francisco (set to open February 1, 2015) and gave some of our project team members the honor of dumping ice water on him to help fight Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease.” Bonds invited San Francisco Giants Manager, Bruce Bochy; Giants President and CEO, Larry Baer; and former 49ers safety and NFL Hall of Famer, Ronnie Lott to take on the challenge.

DPR’s Phoenix office also challenged other DPR offices across the country to face the ice bucket challenge and support the ALS Association.

According to the ALS Association, as of Wed., Aug. 27, the association has received $94.3 million in donations compared to $2.7 million during the same time period last year (July 29 to August 27). These donations have come from existing donors and 2.1 million new donors.

May 27, 2014

San Francisco Office Makes Big Green Move—First Net-Zero Energy Office in the City

It really is greener on the other side of the street—or in this case a few blocks away.
 
DPR’s San Francisco office made a big move this month from its long-time home on Sansome Street to a new net-zero-designed space at 945 Front Street. Recently featured in the San Francisco Chronicle, the office space is on track to be the first net zero office in San Francisco and one of only a handful in the nation.

Lobby of DPR's new San Francisco office featuring a living wall (Photo: Drew Kelly)

While the previous DPR San Francisco digs were LEED certified, this new space pushes green building further. The office boasts a host of unique green solutions, including recycled products throughout, dynamic glass that tints to let in the appropriate amount of light, fans to circulate air, and solar panels to convert San Francisco’s sunlight to power, which should generate more electricity than the building needs—about a third of the amount that a typical San Francisco office building uses—to run comfortably over the next year.

For more features and details read the full press release.