Eve R. Forward
DPR's Roving Reporter

Eve R.  Forward

Eve R. Forward is DPR Construction's roving reporter. Born in 1990 in Redwood City, Eve lives and breathes DPR...Literally.

Posts: 89
Location: Redwood City, California
Favorite core value: Ever Forward, naturally! I was named after this core value.
Hometown: I was born in Redwood City, but now I live all over the country.
Best part of the job: Asking the hard-hitting questions that need answers.
Posts In: Communities, Construction Technologies, Corporate Office, Data Centers and Mission Critical, Healthcare, Higher Education, Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Lean, Life Sciences, News, Sustainability, Technical Papers, Videos


July 2, 2015

DPR Celebrates 25 Years of Building Great Things

DPR Construction was founded 25 years ago today by Doug Woods, Peter Nosler and Ron Davidowski.

1990 was the same year that smoking was banned on domestic flights, Microsoft released Windows 3.0, Tim Berners-Lee developed the World Wide Web, and the first U.S. digital cellular call was made. It was also the year that Iraq invaded Kuwait, leading to the start of the Gulf War, and the Dow Jones closed the year at 2633, and the world entered a recession.

It was an uncertain time. Yet three construction industry veterans still set out to do something different in an industry traditionally resistant to change. Starting our first year with 11 employees, DPR grew and reached the $1 billion mark in less than 10 years.

Today with 20 offices, 3,000-plus employees and more than 8,700 projects completed totaling some $29.7 billion, we’ve has had the opportunity to work with and learn from some of the most progressive companies. We look forward to the next 25 years—working together to build a better future for generations to come.

Take a look at DPR in the early days:

 

We'll be celebrating our birthday on social media for the rest of the year. Look for #DPR25.

Happy Birthday, DPR! Happy Birthday, United States of America!

 

June 30, 2015

The Evolution of Projects, Processes and the Profession

How has the construction industry changed in the last 25 years?

Technology is only part of the answer.

In 1990, “The FedEx pick-up deadline and fax machines were the drivers of the day," says Martin Fischer, director of Stanford University’s Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (CIFE).

"Even a single computer on a jobsite was a big deal,” he continues.

How have innovations and pressures added to project complexity? How has project delivery shifted? What's the difference in the workforce? Learn the answers to these questions and more in the cover story of the latest DPR Review.

Check out the differences in technology from 1990 (pictured left) versus today (pictured right):

June 15, 2015

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay: Integrated Project, Integrated Delivery

The UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay in San Francisco is the nation’s first integrated project of its size and scope, according an article published by Healthcare Design, a resource that reaches, informs and influences key decision makers responsible for healthcare facilities.

The 289-bed, six-story, 878,000-sq.-ft. campus is home to three specialty hospitals:

  • The 183-bed Benioff Children’s Hospital with urgent/emergency care, primary care and specialty outpatient services.
  • The Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital offering cancer care, specialty surgery and 36-bed birth center.
  • The 70-bed Bakar Cancer Hospital for adults.

The team, which included DPR and Stantec, also built the project using an integrated approach—working together nearly 18 months prior to the start of construction to virtually design and construct the facility in the Integrated Center for Design and Construction (ICDC) onsite. Techniques including target value design, building information modeling (BIM), model-based estimating, and lean methodology allowed the team to reduce costs without reducing scope.

“There’s a lot of interest beyond our shores about how we were able to do this and how it can be adopted into other places,” UCSF Director of Design and Construction Stuart Eckblad told Healthcare Design. “I think we’ve made a significant contribution in how people are thinking about their buildings…and instead of thinking about the cost, thinking about the value.”

Completed late last year and opened on Feb. 1, the project has achieved LEED Gold certification and won a Fiatech CETI award for scenario-based project planning, as well as been spoken about at numerous national conferences, including ASHE PDC in San Antonio in March.

April 14, 2015

Fortune Magazine’s “Toasting the Boss (a.k.a. Everyone)”

In 1990, Doug Woods, Peter Nosler and Ron Davidowski founded DPR and vowed to create a company that prioritizes employee happiness. 

Fortune Magazine's "Toasting the Boss (a.k.a. Everyone)" explores DPR's unique structure and culture. It also explores how the company has empowered its employees to take the lead for the last 25 years.

Brian Gracz, who has been with the company for 17 years, is quoted in the article as saying: "We have the ability—no matter who you are in the organization—to be able to provide input and impact and have your thoughts and ideas considered."

Peter Salvati, who sits on DPR's Management Committee, goes on to say: "In a sense, everyone's in charge."

Click the image below to read the full article:

Photo Credit: David Cox


What do you think empowers employees?

February 10, 2015

BIM-Enabled Virtual Reality at VA Hospital Renovation

At a renovation project within a working hospital at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System (VCUHS), DPR is using Oculus Rift goggles to let end users virtually walk through BIM mockups. The team broke ground on this beta technology, which was originally created for the video games industry.

Using the goggles, end users (doctors and nurses, in this case) can explore the finished space and give feedback before construction begins. Given the portability of the system, the team can set up user feedback sessions easily and quickly, which is essential given the hospital staff's limited availability as well as space constraints.

How has the team's use of this technology benefitted the project?

  • Creating an immersive virtual mockup using Oculus Rift cost just a fraction—less than 15%—of what was originally budgeted for a physical mockup.
  • Virtual walk-throughs yielded more than 35 suggested changes (including added storage space and moving equipment).

Get the full story here.


Photo Credit: Mollie Shackleford

February 5, 2015

Tracking Green at Space Designed for Net-Zero Energy

At DPR's San Francisco office-—which is designed for net-zero energy—it's all about collecting data and using it for optimization. Like each DPR green/net-zero energy building before it, DPR will use the collected building data to improve the next space. 

The office uses 3 primary data collection and building management technologies, which include:

  • Integrated Honeywell building management system—the “brains” of the building;
  • Lucid Building Dashboard®— the key energy use “benchmarking” tool; and
  • LEED Dynamic Plaque™—a new technology that tracks LEED certification. 

Learn more about how DPR is using these technologies to optimize the high-performing building in this article.


DPR's office is one of the earliest adopters piloting the new LEED Dynamic Plaque™. Photo Credit: Lyzz Schwegler

January 30, 2015

Data Centers and Beers…What’s the Connection?

Pint, 6-pack, 36-pack or keg? 

In DPR's latest white paper—The Convergence of Healthcare and IT—the considerations that go into deciding whether to lease or own a data center are compared to buying beer.

Selecting the right data center solution for managing electronic health records—or combination of solutions—has serious business consequences for owners. The right option depends on a company’s size and need. 

Choices range from the "full service data" option of leasing servers from cloud providers (like buying a pint at a bar) to the "do it yourself" option of owning and operating one's own data center (like purchasing a keg). 

Read more here or read the full white paper, written by DPR's Hamilton Espinosa, David Ibarra and Mark Thompson. 


Photo Credit: David Cox

January 20, 2015

A Bird’s Eye View: Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Data Collection

On more than 15 DPR projects nationwide, project teams are reaping the benefits of using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or "drones").

Teams are using this technology for data collection. UAVs fly across project jobsites and take up to thousands of pictures. The pictures are then stitched into a large mosaic image, which project teams can use as a map to communicate and collaborate.

Pictured above: The team building the Betty and Bob Beyster Institute for Nursing Research, Advanced Practice and Simulation at the University of San Diego uses their images and video to communicate project updates.

Learn more here: Experience a "Day in the Life" of DPR project teams that use UAVs.

Want to learn even more about UAVs in general? Here's a recent Wall Street Journal article (subscription required) about the phenomenon.

January 13, 2015

Technology Pushing Greater Service (at Lower Cost) for Life of Building

In an in-depth Q&A with DPR's Atul Khanzode, he shares the insight gained through his decade of virtual design and construction (VDC) and lean experience on complex projects. Khanzode leads DPR’s strategic VDC technology initiatives.

"It’s not so much about the specific technologies we’re using, but more about how we are applying those technologies to enhance the delivery process for our customers," he says. 

Khanzode also touches on major challenges facing the industry, what's popular in construction technology and how it's changing the construction industry. 

"The use of tested technologies is playing a key role in adding reliability to the process, allowing us to better predict project outcomes for our customers," he says.


Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or “drones”) are helpful in data collection so teams can track construction progress (just one example of a construction technology trend)

January 6, 2015

How Team’s Technical Expertise Helped Gulfstream Project Soar

With BIM and lean techniques being especially helpful for equipment and schedule coordination, DPR Hardin built a 430,000-sq.-ft. manufacturing space for Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation. 

Gulfstream develops and manufactures the world’s most technologically advanced business-jet aircraft. However, it wasn't DPR Hardin’s deep aerospace experience that ultimately won the job; it was solid technical expertise, which offers clear parallels to aerospace manufacturing.

How did collaboration with the owner, a unique foundation and a complex web of infrastructure systems factor into the equation? 

Read the full story here to learn more (including why it was described as "one of coolest, most challenging and satisfying jobs most of the team has ever built").


Photo by David Robinson Photography